Alterations in femoral strain, micromotion, cortical geometry, cortical porosity, and bony ingrowth in uncemented collared and collarless prostheses in the dog

Paul A. Manley, Ray Vanderby, Sean Kohles, Mark D. Markel, John P. Heiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of a collared femoral endoprosthesis in uncemented total hip arthroplasty were evaluated in 12 dogs. This experimental study compared the biomechanic and histologic responses between collared and collarless femoral prostheses 4 months after implantation. Implant stability (micromotion) and cortical surface strain were evaluated immediately and 4 months after implantation in a simulated postoperative condition, whereas bone ingrowth, cortical porosity, and cortical remodeling were assessed after 4 months only. There were no significant differences in implant stability or cortical surface strains when the collared and collarless groups were compared acutely or after 4 months (P 〉 .05). There were also no significant differences in percent fill, bony ingrowth, or cortical geometry after 4 months (P 〉 .05). There was a significant increase in cortical porosity measured from the proximal femur after 4 months for both the collared (P = .0002) and collarless groups (P = .009) and when both groups were compared (collarless, 8.2% and collared, 5.8%; P = .03). The results suggest that a collar may be beneficial in decreasing the cortical remodeling that occurs in the proximal femoral cortex after implantation of an uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Keywords

  • collar
  • collarless
  • dog
  • hip arthroplasty
  • histomorphometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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