African american mothers' self-described discipline strategies with young children in 1992 and 2012

Elizabeth A. LeCuyer, Julie J. Christensen, Donna Kreher, Margaret H. Kearney, Harriet J. Kitzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this qualitative descriptive study, 30 young, unmarried, low-income African American mothers in Memphis, TN, were interviewed in 2011-2012 about their discipline strategies with their 12- to 19-month-old children. Using content analyses, their strategies were described and compared with those from a similar sample in 1992. Findings suggest both continuity and change during that 20-year period. More mothers in 2011-2012 described the use of distraction and time out, suggesting a wider variety of strategies than were used in 1992. These findings may help clinicians to better understand disciplinary methods in young low-income African American mothers such as these in Memphis. Approaching mothers in a respectful and culturally sensitive manner will help them focus on effective, developmentally appropriate strategies consistent with their own parenting goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-37
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Health Care
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • African american
  • Behavior problems
  • Children
  • Discipline
  • Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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