African American and European American Mothers' Limit-Setting with Their 36 Month-Old Children

Elizabeth Anne LeCuyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current literature suggests that African American (AA) parents may use higher levels of control and more authoritarian decision-making and disciplinary practices, but sometimes with less negative effects relative to European-American (EA) parents. Descriptive observational studies of actual limit-setting and disciplinary behaviors in AA families, however, are lacking. In this study, maternal limit-setting behaviors and patterns were observed, described, and compared in 50 AA and 66 EA mothers (ages 18-53) with their 36 month-old children. Controlling for demographic risk and children's gender, there were no ethnic differences in the distribution of maternal limit-setting patterns, and an authoritative limit-setting pattern was the most common pattern in both ethnic groups. AA and EA mothers using an authoritative pattern used firm control along with greater use of less-directive and empathic strategies such as reasoning, distractions, and sensitive support of their child's autonomy. These data provide support for the normative use of age-appropriate authoritative limit-setting in AA and EA mothers with 36 month-old children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-284
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Mothers
parents
Parents
Ethnic Groups
Observational Studies
Decision Making
ethnic group
autonomy
Demography
American
decision making
gender

Keywords

  • African American
  • Child discipline
  • Cultural diversity
  • Parental discipline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

African American and European American Mothers' Limit-Setting with Their 36 Month-Old Children. / LeCuyer, Elizabeth Anne.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 23, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 275-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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