Aerobic fitness relates to learning on a virtual Morris Water Task and hippocampal volume in adolescents

Megan M. Herting, Bonnie Nagel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In rodents, exercise increases hippocampal neurogenesis and allows for better learning and memory performance on water maze tasks. While exercise has also been shown to be beneficial for the brain and behavior in humans, no study has examined how exercise impacts spatial learning using a directly translational water maze task, or if these relationships exist during adolescence - a developmental period which the animal literature has shown to be especially vulnerable to exercise effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of aerobic fitness on hippocampal size and subsequent learning and memory, including visuospatial memory using a human analogue of the Morris Water Task, in 34 adolescents. Results showed that higher aerobic fitness predicted better learning on the virtual Morris Water Task and larger hippocampal volumes. No relationship between virtual Morris Water Task memory recall and aerobic fitness was detected. Aerobic fitness, however, did not relate to global brain volume or verbal learning, which might suggest some specificity of the influence of aerobic fitness on the adolescent brain. This study provides a direct translational approach to the existing animal literature on exercise, as well as adds to the sparse research that exists on how aerobic exercise impacts the developing human brain and memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-525
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume233
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

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Learning
Exercise
Water
Brain
Verbal Learning
Neurogenesis
Rodentia
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Exercise
  • Hippocampus
  • Neuroimaging
  • Spatial memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Aerobic fitness relates to learning on a virtual Morris Water Task and hippocampal volume in adolescents. / Herting, Megan M.; Nagel, Bonnie.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 233, No. 2, 01.08.2012, p. 517-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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