Adverse drug reactions to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral regimen: A 24-week prospective study

Anupam Jena, Ravinder K. Sachdeva, Aman Sharma, Ajay Wanchu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Few studies have addressed the issue of adverse drug reactions with non-protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-constrained settings. We studied prospectively the incidence of adverse drug reactions with generic ART among our patients. Methodology: A total of 100 HIV-infected individuals were recruited. Patients received nevirapine (NVP) or efavirenz (EFV) with lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (ZDV)/stavudine (d4T). They were followed for 6 months for evidence of adverse drug reactions. Results: The mean CD4 count was 114.09 ± 60.07 cells/mm 3 (range, 12-232 cells/mm 3). Transient gastrointestinal symptoms were most frequent. Fourteen individuals (12 receiving ZDV/d4T, 3TC, NVP and 2 receiving ZDV/d4T, 3TC, EFV) developed skin rash. Among patients receiving NVP, 25.7% developed grade 1 hepatotoxicity. Three patients had numbness in both lower limbs. Among those individuals who received EFV, 32.3% individuals had central nervous system (CNS) symptoms in the form of insomnia, vivid dreams, dizziness, and drowsiness. Conclusion: As the developing world increasingly uses generic ART, the clinician must be constantly vigilant for treatment-related adverse events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-322
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • HIV
  • adverse drug reaction
  • anti-retroviral therapy
  • nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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