Adverse Childhood Experiences in Mothers With Chronic Pain and Intergenerational Impact on Children

Catlin H. Dennis, Denae S. Clohessy, Amanda L. Stone, Beth D. Darnall, Anna Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; eg, parental divorce, physical or sexual abuse) are more prevalent in individuals with chronic pain compared with the general population. Both increased maternal ACEs and chronic pain have been associated with poor physical and emotional functioning in offspring. However, the mechanisms driving these associations are poorly understood. Thus, this cross-sectional study evaluated the relation between maternal ACEs, mothers’ current functioning, and children's physical and emotional functioning in a sample of mothers with chronic pain and their 8- to 12-year-old children. Results indicated a higher prevalence of ≥1 ACE in this sample of mothers with chronic pain (84%) compared with normative data from a community sample of women. Higher maternal ACE scores corresponded with lower physical and social functioning, greater anxiety and depressive symptoms, greater fatigue and sleep disturbances, and greater pain intensity and pain interference in mothers. Higher maternal ACE scores significantly correlated with higher child self-reported depressive symptoms, but not somatic symptoms or functional impairment. A path model indicated that maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between higher maternal ACE scores and children's depressive symptoms. Intervening on maternal depression among mothers with chronic pain may reduce the impact of intergenerational ACE transmission. Perspective: This article presents evidence regarding the intergenerational impact of ACEs in a large sample of mothers with chronic pain and their school-aged children. Maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between maternal ACEs and children's depressive symptoms providing evidence regarding targets for preventive interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pain
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Chronic Pain
Mothers
Depression
Pain
Divorce
Sex Offenses
Fatigue
Sleep
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • ACEs
  • adverse childhood experiences
  • Chronic pain
  • depression
  • pediatric pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Adverse Childhood Experiences in Mothers With Chronic Pain and Intergenerational Impact on Children. / Dennis, Catlin H.; Clohessy, Denae S.; Stone, Amanda L.; Darnall, Beth D.; Wilson, Anna.

In: Journal of Pain, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dennis, Catlin H. ; Clohessy, Denae S. ; Stone, Amanda L. ; Darnall, Beth D. ; Wilson, Anna. / Adverse Childhood Experiences in Mothers With Chronic Pain and Intergenerational Impact on Children. In: Journal of Pain. 2019.
@article{9c5ccbbf01e24800948228e3aab00575,
title = "Adverse Childhood Experiences in Mothers With Chronic Pain and Intergenerational Impact on Children",
abstract = "Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; eg, parental divorce, physical or sexual abuse) are more prevalent in individuals with chronic pain compared with the general population. Both increased maternal ACEs and chronic pain have been associated with poor physical and emotional functioning in offspring. However, the mechanisms driving these associations are poorly understood. Thus, this cross-sectional study evaluated the relation between maternal ACEs, mothers’ current functioning, and children's physical and emotional functioning in a sample of mothers with chronic pain and their 8- to 12-year-old children. Results indicated a higher prevalence of ≥1 ACE in this sample of mothers with chronic pain (84{\%}) compared with normative data from a community sample of women. Higher maternal ACE scores corresponded with lower physical and social functioning, greater anxiety and depressive symptoms, greater fatigue and sleep disturbances, and greater pain intensity and pain interference in mothers. Higher maternal ACE scores significantly correlated with higher child self-reported depressive symptoms, but not somatic symptoms or functional impairment. A path model indicated that maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between higher maternal ACE scores and children's depressive symptoms. Intervening on maternal depression among mothers with chronic pain may reduce the impact of intergenerational ACE transmission. Perspective: This article presents evidence regarding the intergenerational impact of ACEs in a large sample of mothers with chronic pain and their school-aged children. Maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between maternal ACEs and children's depressive symptoms providing evidence regarding targets for preventive interventions.",
keywords = "ACEs, adverse childhood experiences, Chronic pain, depression, pediatric pain",
author = "Dennis, {Catlin H.} and Clohessy, {Denae S.} and Stone, {Amanda L.} and Darnall, {Beth D.} and Anna Wilson",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpain.2019.04.004",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Pain",
issn = "1526-5900",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adverse Childhood Experiences in Mothers With Chronic Pain and Intergenerational Impact on Children

AU - Dennis, Catlin H.

AU - Clohessy, Denae S.

AU - Stone, Amanda L.

AU - Darnall, Beth D.

AU - Wilson, Anna

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; eg, parental divorce, physical or sexual abuse) are more prevalent in individuals with chronic pain compared with the general population. Both increased maternal ACEs and chronic pain have been associated with poor physical and emotional functioning in offspring. However, the mechanisms driving these associations are poorly understood. Thus, this cross-sectional study evaluated the relation between maternal ACEs, mothers’ current functioning, and children's physical and emotional functioning in a sample of mothers with chronic pain and their 8- to 12-year-old children. Results indicated a higher prevalence of ≥1 ACE in this sample of mothers with chronic pain (84%) compared with normative data from a community sample of women. Higher maternal ACE scores corresponded with lower physical and social functioning, greater anxiety and depressive symptoms, greater fatigue and sleep disturbances, and greater pain intensity and pain interference in mothers. Higher maternal ACE scores significantly correlated with higher child self-reported depressive symptoms, but not somatic symptoms or functional impairment. A path model indicated that maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between higher maternal ACE scores and children's depressive symptoms. Intervening on maternal depression among mothers with chronic pain may reduce the impact of intergenerational ACE transmission. Perspective: This article presents evidence regarding the intergenerational impact of ACEs in a large sample of mothers with chronic pain and their school-aged children. Maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between maternal ACEs and children's depressive symptoms providing evidence regarding targets for preventive interventions.

AB - Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; eg, parental divorce, physical or sexual abuse) are more prevalent in individuals with chronic pain compared with the general population. Both increased maternal ACEs and chronic pain have been associated with poor physical and emotional functioning in offspring. However, the mechanisms driving these associations are poorly understood. Thus, this cross-sectional study evaluated the relation between maternal ACEs, mothers’ current functioning, and children's physical and emotional functioning in a sample of mothers with chronic pain and their 8- to 12-year-old children. Results indicated a higher prevalence of ≥1 ACE in this sample of mothers with chronic pain (84%) compared with normative data from a community sample of women. Higher maternal ACE scores corresponded with lower physical and social functioning, greater anxiety and depressive symptoms, greater fatigue and sleep disturbances, and greater pain intensity and pain interference in mothers. Higher maternal ACE scores significantly correlated with higher child self-reported depressive symptoms, but not somatic symptoms or functional impairment. A path model indicated that maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between higher maternal ACE scores and children's depressive symptoms. Intervening on maternal depression among mothers with chronic pain may reduce the impact of intergenerational ACE transmission. Perspective: This article presents evidence regarding the intergenerational impact of ACEs in a large sample of mothers with chronic pain and their school-aged children. Maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the relation between maternal ACEs and children's depressive symptoms providing evidence regarding targets for preventive interventions.

KW - ACEs

KW - adverse childhood experiences

KW - Chronic pain

KW - depression

KW - pediatric pain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065560170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065560170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpain.2019.04.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jpain.2019.04.004

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Pain

JF - Journal of Pain

SN - 1526-5900

ER -