Advances in understanding adenosine as a plurisystem modulator in sepsis and the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)

Beth A. Conlon, James Ross, William R. Law

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adenosine is a ubiquitous molecule that influences every physiological system studied thus far. In this review, we consider the influence of this purine nucleoside on some of the physiological systems affected during sepsis and SIRS. In the control of perfusion and cardiac output distribution, endogenous adenosine appears to play an important role in regulating perfusion in various vascular beds. Some of this control is mediated by stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, while part occurs by stimulating the production of nitric oxide. In the heart, adenosine may act as an inhibitory modulator of TNF-alpha expression. With regard to innate immune responses the effects of adenosine vary considerably, and are complex. However, the dominant responses relevant to SIRS indicate attenuation of inflammatory responses. Many of the effects of adenosine may also involve modulating oxyradical-mediated response. This occurs via increased oxyradical production via adenosine degradation (xanthine oxidase pathway), or limiting inflammatory oxyradical generation. Attempts to exploit the beneficial responses to adenosine have met with some success, and are considered here.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2548-2565
Number of pages18
JournalFrontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
Volume10
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
Adenosine
Modulators
Sepsis
Perfusion
Purine Nucleosides
Xanthine Oxidase
Adenylyl Cyclases
Innate Immunity
Cardiac Output
Blood Vessels
Nitric Oxide
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Degradation
Molecules

Keywords

  • Adenosine
  • Adenosine deaminase
  • Blood flow
  • Cytokine
  • Infection
  • Inflammation
  • Nitric oxide
  • Pentostatin
  • Perfusion
  • Review
  • Sepsis
  • TNF
  • Tumor necrosis factor
  • Vasodilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Advances in understanding adenosine as a plurisystem modulator in sepsis and the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS). / Conlon, Beth A.; Ross, James; Law, William R.

In: Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library, Vol. 10, No. SUPPL. 2, 2005, p. 2548-2565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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