Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons: Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics

Zachary J. Grabel, Robert A. Hart, Aaron P. Clark, Sara Heejung Park, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Justin K. Scheer, Justin S. Smith, Michael P. Kelly, J. Mason DePasse, Munish C. Gupta, Christopher P. Ames, Alan H. Daniels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study Design Survey study. Objective The purpose of this paper was to assess the level of adult spine deformity (ASD) knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons and identify areas for improvement in spine surgery training. Summary of Background Data ASD is increasingly encountered in spine surgery practice. While ASD knowledge among neurosurgeons has been evaluated, ASD knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons has not previously been reported. Methods A survey of orthopedic spine surgeon members of North American Spine Society (NASS) was conducted to assess level of spine surgery training, practice experience, and spinal deformity knowledge base. The survey used was previously completed by a group of neurologic surgeons with published results. The survey used 11 questions developed and agreed upon by experienced spinal deformity surgeons. Results Complete responses were received from 413 orthopedic spine surgeons. The overall correct-answer rate was 69.0%. Surgeons in practice for less than 10 years had a higher correct-answer rate compared to those who have practiced for 10 years or more (74% vs. 67%; p =.000003). Surgeons with 75% or more of their practice dedicated to spine had a higher overall correct rate compared to surgeons whose practice is less than 75% spine (71% vs. 63%; p =.000029). Completion of spine fellowship was associated with a higher overall correct-answer rate compared to respondents who did not complete a spine fellowship (71% vs. 59%; p <.00001). Conclusions Completion of spine fellowship and having a dedicated spine surgery practice were significantly associated with improved performance on this ASD knowledge survey. Unlike neurosurgeons, orthopedic spine surgeons who have practiced for less than 10 years performed better than those who have practiced for more than 10 years. Ongoing emphasis on spine deformity education should be emphasized to improve adult spinal deformity knowledge base.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages60-66
Number of pages7
JournalSpine Deformity
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Knowledge Bases
Spine
Orthopedic Surgeons

Keywords

  • Knowledge base
  • Sducation
  • Spine deformity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Grabel, Z. J., Hart, R. A., Clark, A. P., Park, S. H., Shaffrey, C. I., Scheer, J. K., ... Daniels, A. H. (2018). Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons: Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics. Spine Deformity, 6(1), 60-66. DOI: 10.1016/j.jspd.2017.06.003

Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons : Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics. / Grabel, Zachary J.; Hart, Robert A.; Clark, Aaron P.; Park, Sara Heejung; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Scheer, Justin K.; Smith, Justin S.; Kelly, Michael P.; DePasse, J. Mason; Gupta, Munish C.; Ames, Christopher P.; Daniels, Alan H.

In: Spine Deformity, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 60-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grabel, ZJ, Hart, RA, Clark, AP, Park, SH, Shaffrey, CI, Scheer, JK, Smith, JS, Kelly, MP, DePasse, JM, Gupta, MC, Ames, CP & Daniels, AH 2018, 'Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons: Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics' Spine Deformity, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 60-66. DOI: 10.1016/j.jspd.2017.06.003
Grabel ZJ, Hart RA, Clark AP, Park SH, Shaffrey CI, Scheer JK et al. Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons: Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics. Spine Deformity. 2018 Jan 1;6(1):60-66. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.jspd.2017.06.003
Grabel, Zachary J. ; Hart, Robert A. ; Clark, Aaron P. ; Park, Sara Heejung ; Shaffrey, Christopher I. ; Scheer, Justin K. ; Smith, Justin S. ; Kelly, Michael P. ; DePasse, J. Mason ; Gupta, Munish C. ; Ames, Christopher P. ; Daniels, Alan H./ Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons : Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics. In: Spine Deformity. 2018 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 60-66
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abstract = "Study Design Survey study. Objective The purpose of this paper was to assess the level of adult spine deformity (ASD) knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons and identify areas for improvement in spine surgery training. Summary of Background Data ASD is increasingly encountered in spine surgery practice. While ASD knowledge among neurosurgeons has been evaluated, ASD knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons has not previously been reported. Methods A survey of orthopedic spine surgeon members of North American Spine Society (NASS) was conducted to assess level of spine surgery training, practice experience, and spinal deformity knowledge base. The survey used was previously completed by a group of neurologic surgeons with published results. The survey used 11 questions developed and agreed upon by experienced spinal deformity surgeons. Results Complete responses were received from 413 orthopedic spine surgeons. The overall correct-answer rate was 69.0{\%}. Surgeons in practice for less than 10 years had a higher correct-answer rate compared to those who have practiced for 10 years or more (74{\%} vs. 67{\%}; p =.000003). Surgeons with 75{\%} or more of their practice dedicated to spine had a higher overall correct rate compared to surgeons whose practice is less than 75{\%} spine (71{\%} vs. 63{\%}; p =.000029). Completion of spine fellowship was associated with a higher overall correct-answer rate compared to respondents who did not complete a spine fellowship (71{\%} vs. 59{\%}; p <.00001). Conclusions Completion of spine fellowship and having a dedicated spine surgery practice were significantly associated with improved performance on this ASD knowledge survey. Unlike neurosurgeons, orthopedic spine surgeons who have practiced for less than 10 years performed better than those who have practiced for more than 10 years. Ongoing emphasis on spine deformity education should be emphasized to improve adult spinal deformity knowledge base.",
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