Adult eczema prevalence and associations with asthma and other health and demographic factors: A US population-based study

Jonathan I. Silverberg, Jon M. Hanifin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

252 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Little is known about the epidemiology of eczema in adults. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations with adult eczema in the United States. Methods We used the 2010 National Health Interview Survey from a nationally representative sample of 27,157 adults age 18 to 85 years. Results Overall, the 1-year prevalence of eczema was 10.2% (95% CI, 9.7% to 10.6%). The 1-year prevalence of eczema with asthma and/or hay fever was 3.2% (95% CI, 2.8% to 3.3%). Adult eczema was associated with higher prevalence of asthma (P <.001, Rao-Scott χ2 test), more asthma attacks in the past year (P <.001), and more persistent asthma (P =.02). In multivariate models eczema prevalence was significantly higher in older participants; female subjects; those with Hispanic ethnicity, US birthplace, and higher level of household education; and those currently working (all P ≤.02, logistic regression). Conclusions This study provides US population-based estimates of eczema prevalence and asthma associations in adults. The results suggest multiple demographic and socioeconomic influences on the US prevalence of adult eczema.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1132-1138
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume132
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • Eczema
  • Hispanic
  • age
  • asthma
  • atopic dermatitis
  • atopic disease
  • birthplace
  • dermatitis
  • ethnicity
  • hay fever
  • race
  • rhinoconjunctivitis
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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