Acute ethanol does not always affect delay discounting in rats selected to prefer or avoid ethanol

Clare Wilhelm, Suzanne Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether animals predisposed to prefer alcohol possess an altered acute response to alcohol on a delay discounting task relative to animals predisposed to avoid alcohol. Methods: We used rats selected to prefer or avoid alcohol to assess whether genotype moderates changes in delay discounting induced by acute ethanol exposure. Selectively bred rat lines of Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP; n = 8) and non-preferring (sNP; n = 8) rats, and alko alcohol (AA, n = 8) and alko non-alcohol (ANA, n = 8) rats were trained in an adjusting amount task to assess delay discounting. Results: There were no significant effects of line on baseline discounting; however, both lines of alcohol-preferring rats exhibit slowed reaction times. Acute ethanol (0, 0.25, 0.5 g/kg) treatment also had no effect on delay discounting in any of the selectively bred rat lines. Conclusion: Our data indicate that in these lines of animals, alcohol preference or avoidance has no impact on delay discounting following acute ethanol exposure. It is possible that other genetic models or lines may be differentially affected by alcohol and exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively different responses in delay discounting tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberags059
Pages (from-to)518-524
Number of pages7
JournalAlcohol and Alcoholism
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Rats
Ethanol
Alcohols
Animals
Delay Discounting
Genetic Models
Genotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Acute ethanol does not always affect delay discounting in rats selected to prefer or avoid ethanol. / Wilhelm, Clare; Mitchell, Suzanne.

In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Vol. 47, No. 5, ags059, 09.2012, p. 518-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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