Active Gaming among High School Students - United States, 2010

MinKyoung Song, Dianna D. Carroll, Sarah M. Lee, Janet E. Fulton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Our study is the first to describe the prevalence and correlates (demographics, body mass index [BMI], sedentary behaviors, and physical activity) of high school youth who report active videogame playing (active gaming) in a U.S. representative sample. Materials and Methods: The National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Study of 2010 provided data for this study. Active gaming was assessed as the number of days in the 7 days prior to the survey that students in grades 9-12 (14-18 years of age) reported participating in active videogames (e.g., "Wii™ Fit" [Nintendo, Kyoto, Japan], "Dance Dance Revolution" [Konami, Osaka, Japan]). Students reporting ≥1 days were classified as active gamers. Logistic regression was used to examine the association among active gaming and demographic characteristics, BMI, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity. Results: Among 9125 U.S. high school students in grades 9-12 surveyed, 39.9 percent (95 percent confidence interval=37.9 percent, 42.0 percent) reported active gaming. Adjusting for covariates, the following characteristics were positively associated (P<0.05) with active gaming: being in 9th and 10th grades compared with being in 12th grade; being of black, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity; being overweight or obese; watching DVDs >0 hours/day; watching TV >0 hours/day; and meeting guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity. Conclusions: Four out of 10 U.S. high school students report participating in active gaming. Active gamers tend to spend more time watching DVDs or TV, meet guidelines for physical activity, and/or be overweight or obese compared with nonactive gamers. These findings may serve to provide a baseline to track active gaming in U.S. youth and inform interventions that target sedentary behaviors and/or physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalGames for health journal
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Exercise
Students
Dancing
school
student
dance
Videodisks
Japan
Body Mass Index
Nutrition
school grade
Demography
Guidelines
Muscle
Logistics
DVD
nutrition
Logistic Models
confidence
logistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Active Gaming among High School Students - United States, 2010. / Song, MinKyoung; Carroll, Dianna D.; Lee, Sarah M.; Fulton, Janet E.

In: Games for health journal, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 325-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Song, MinKyoung ; Carroll, Dianna D. ; Lee, Sarah M. ; Fulton, Janet E. / Active Gaming among High School Students - United States, 2010. In: Games for health journal. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 325-331.
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