Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics

Erin J. Aiello Bowles, Diana L. Miglioretti, Edward A. Sickles, Linn Abraham, Patricia (Patty) Carney, Bonnie C. Yankaskas, Joann G. Elmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of our study was to examine the accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms and evaluate patient and radiologist characteristics associated with accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We evaluated 45,007 initial short-interval follow-up mammograms from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium interpreted 3-9 months after a probably benign assessment on a screening or diagnostic examination between 1994 and 2004. We linked these mammograms with patient characteristics and breast cancer diagnoses within 12 months. A subset of short-interval follow-up examinations (n = 13,907) was merged with radiologist characteristics collected from survey data from 130 interpreting radiologists. Using logistic regression, we fit generalized estimating equations to model sensitivity and specificity of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. RESULTS. For every 1,000 women, 8.0 women (0.8%) were diagnosed with breast cancer within 6 months and 11.3 (1.1%) within 12 months. Sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI, 79.4-87.3%) for cancers diagnosed within 6 months and 60.5% (56.2-64.7%) for those diagnosed within 12 months. Specificity was 97.2% (96.9-97.6%) at 6 months and 97.3% (96.9-97.6%) at 12 months. Sensitivity at 12 months increased among women with unilateral short-interval follow-up mammograms (odds ratio, 1.56 [95% CI, 1.06-2.29]) and when the interpreting radiologist spent more than 10 hours a week in breast imaging (odds ratio, 3.25 [1.00-10.52]). CONCLUSION. Initial short-interval follow-up mammography examinations had a lower sensitivity for detecting breast cancer within 12 months than other diagnostic mammograms (61% for short-interval follow-up vs 80% for diagnostic mammograms reported in the literature). However, sensitivity within the 6-month interval that is usually recommended for subsequent follow-up was 83%. Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms was influenced by few patient and radiologist characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1200-1208
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume190
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Breast Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Mammography
Radiologists
Breast
Logistic Models
Sensitivity and Specificity
Neoplasms
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Diagnostic mammography
  • Sensitivity
  • Short-interval follow-up mammography
  • Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Aiello Bowles, E. J., Miglioretti, D. L., Sickles, E. A., Abraham, L., Carney, P. P., Yankaskas, B. C., & Elmore, J. G. (2008). Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. American Journal of Roentgenology, 190(5), 1200-1208. https://doi.org/10.2214/AJR.07.3041

Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. / Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Sickles, Edward A.; Abraham, Linn; Carney, Patricia (Patty); Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Elmore, Joann G.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 190, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 1200-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aiello Bowles, EJ, Miglioretti, DL, Sickles, EA, Abraham, L, Carney, PP, Yankaskas, BC & Elmore, JG 2008, 'Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 190, no. 5, pp. 1200-1208. https://doi.org/10.2214/AJR.07.3041
Aiello Bowles, Erin J. ; Miglioretti, Diana L. ; Sickles, Edward A. ; Abraham, Linn ; Carney, Patricia (Patty) ; Yankaskas, Bonnie C. ; Elmore, Joann G. / Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2008 ; Vol. 190, No. 5. pp. 1200-1208.
@article{2ee6c31c762d4e95809e5284e72f66d4,
title = "Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE. The purpose of our study was to examine the accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms and evaluate patient and radiologist characteristics associated with accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We evaluated 45,007 initial short-interval follow-up mammograms from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium interpreted 3-9 months after a probably benign assessment on a screening or diagnostic examination between 1994 and 2004. We linked these mammograms with patient characteristics and breast cancer diagnoses within 12 months. A subset of short-interval follow-up examinations (n = 13,907) was merged with radiologist characteristics collected from survey data from 130 interpreting radiologists. Using logistic regression, we fit generalized estimating equations to model sensitivity and specificity of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. RESULTS. For every 1,000 women, 8.0 women (0.8{\%}) were diagnosed with breast cancer within 6 months and 11.3 (1.1{\%}) within 12 months. Sensitivity was 83.3{\%} (95{\%} CI, 79.4-87.3{\%}) for cancers diagnosed within 6 months and 60.5{\%} (56.2-64.7{\%}) for those diagnosed within 12 months. Specificity was 97.2{\%} (96.9-97.6{\%}) at 6 months and 97.3{\%} (96.9-97.6{\%}) at 12 months. Sensitivity at 12 months increased among women with unilateral short-interval follow-up mammograms (odds ratio, 1.56 [95{\%} CI, 1.06-2.29]) and when the interpreting radiologist spent more than 10 hours a week in breast imaging (odds ratio, 3.25 [1.00-10.52]). CONCLUSION. Initial short-interval follow-up mammography examinations had a lower sensitivity for detecting breast cancer within 12 months than other diagnostic mammograms (61{\%} for short-interval follow-up vs 80{\%} for diagnostic mammograms reported in the literature). However, sensitivity within the 6-month interval that is usually recommended for subsequent follow-up was 83{\%}. Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms was influenced by few patient and radiologist characteristics.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Diagnostic mammography, Sensitivity, Short-interval follow-up mammography, Specificity",
author = "{Aiello Bowles}, {Erin J.} and Miglioretti, {Diana L.} and Sickles, {Edward A.} and Linn Abraham and Carney, {Patricia (Patty)} and Yankaskas, {Bonnie C.} and Elmore, {Joann G.}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
doi = "10.2214/AJR.07.3041",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "190",
pages = "1200--1208",
journal = "AJR. American journal of roentgenology",
issn = "0361-803X",
publisher = "American Roentgen Ray Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics

AU - Aiello Bowles, Erin J.

AU - Miglioretti, Diana L.

AU - Sickles, Edward A.

AU - Abraham, Linn

AU - Carney, Patricia (Patty)

AU - Yankaskas, Bonnie C.

AU - Elmore, Joann G.

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE. The purpose of our study was to examine the accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms and evaluate patient and radiologist characteristics associated with accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We evaluated 45,007 initial short-interval follow-up mammograms from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium interpreted 3-9 months after a probably benign assessment on a screening or diagnostic examination between 1994 and 2004. We linked these mammograms with patient characteristics and breast cancer diagnoses within 12 months. A subset of short-interval follow-up examinations (n = 13,907) was merged with radiologist characteristics collected from survey data from 130 interpreting radiologists. Using logistic regression, we fit generalized estimating equations to model sensitivity and specificity of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. RESULTS. For every 1,000 women, 8.0 women (0.8%) were diagnosed with breast cancer within 6 months and 11.3 (1.1%) within 12 months. Sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI, 79.4-87.3%) for cancers diagnosed within 6 months and 60.5% (56.2-64.7%) for those diagnosed within 12 months. Specificity was 97.2% (96.9-97.6%) at 6 months and 97.3% (96.9-97.6%) at 12 months. Sensitivity at 12 months increased among women with unilateral short-interval follow-up mammograms (odds ratio, 1.56 [95% CI, 1.06-2.29]) and when the interpreting radiologist spent more than 10 hours a week in breast imaging (odds ratio, 3.25 [1.00-10.52]). CONCLUSION. Initial short-interval follow-up mammography examinations had a lower sensitivity for detecting breast cancer within 12 months than other diagnostic mammograms (61% for short-interval follow-up vs 80% for diagnostic mammograms reported in the literature). However, sensitivity within the 6-month interval that is usually recommended for subsequent follow-up was 83%. Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms was influenced by few patient and radiologist characteristics.

AB - OBJECTIVE. The purpose of our study was to examine the accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms and evaluate patient and radiologist characteristics associated with accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We evaluated 45,007 initial short-interval follow-up mammograms from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium interpreted 3-9 months after a probably benign assessment on a screening or diagnostic examination between 1994 and 2004. We linked these mammograms with patient characteristics and breast cancer diagnoses within 12 months. A subset of short-interval follow-up examinations (n = 13,907) was merged with radiologist characteristics collected from survey data from 130 interpreting radiologists. Using logistic regression, we fit generalized estimating equations to model sensitivity and specificity of short-interval follow-up mammograms by patient and radiologist characteristics. RESULTS. For every 1,000 women, 8.0 women (0.8%) were diagnosed with breast cancer within 6 months and 11.3 (1.1%) within 12 months. Sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI, 79.4-87.3%) for cancers diagnosed within 6 months and 60.5% (56.2-64.7%) for those diagnosed within 12 months. Specificity was 97.2% (96.9-97.6%) at 6 months and 97.3% (96.9-97.6%) at 12 months. Sensitivity at 12 months increased among women with unilateral short-interval follow-up mammograms (odds ratio, 1.56 [95% CI, 1.06-2.29]) and when the interpreting radiologist spent more than 10 hours a week in breast imaging (odds ratio, 3.25 [1.00-10.52]). CONCLUSION. Initial short-interval follow-up mammography examinations had a lower sensitivity for detecting breast cancer within 12 months than other diagnostic mammograms (61% for short-interval follow-up vs 80% for diagnostic mammograms reported in the literature). However, sensitivity within the 6-month interval that is usually recommended for subsequent follow-up was 83%. Accuracy of short-interval follow-up mammograms was influenced by few patient and radiologist characteristics.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Diagnostic mammography

KW - Sensitivity

KW - Short-interval follow-up mammography

KW - Specificity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=43649090200&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=43649090200&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2214/AJR.07.3041

DO - 10.2214/AJR.07.3041

M3 - Article

C2 - 18430832

AN - SCOPUS:43649090200

VL - 190

SP - 1200

EP - 1208

JO - AJR. American journal of roentgenology

JF - AJR. American journal of roentgenology

SN - 0361-803X

IS - 5

ER -