Access to multiple sclerosis specialty care

Aaron P. Turner, Michael K. Chapko, Norbert Yanez, Steve L. Leipertz, Alicia P. Sloan, Ruth Whitham, Jodie K. Haselkorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Health care providers recommend an annual visit to a multiple sclerosis specialty care provider. Objective: To examine potential barriers to the implementation of this recommendation in the Veterans Health Administration. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Veterans Health Administration. Participants: Participants were drawn from the Veterans Affairs Multiple Sclerosis National Data Repository and were included if they had an outpatient visit in 2007 and were alive in 2008 (N= 14,723). Main Outcome Measurements: Specialty care visit, receipt of medical services. Results: A total of 9643 (65.5%) participants had a specialty care visit in 2007. Veterans who were service connected, had greater medical comorbidity, and who lived in urban settings were more likely to have received a specialty care visit. Veterans who were older and had to travel greater distances to a center were less likely to have a specialty care visit. Conclusions: Access to care in rural areas and areas at a greater distance from a majormedical center represent notable barriers to rehabilitation and other multiple sclerosis-related care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1050
Number of pages7
JournalPM and R
Volume5
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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Veterans
Multiple Sclerosis
Veterans Health
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Health Personnel
Observational Studies
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Outpatients
Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Turner, A. P., Chapko, M. K., Yanez, N., Leipertz, S. L., Sloan, A. P., Whitham, R., & Haselkorn, J. K. (2013). Access to multiple sclerosis specialty care. PM and R, 5(12), 1044-1050. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.07.009

Access to multiple sclerosis specialty care. / Turner, Aaron P.; Chapko, Michael K.; Yanez, Norbert; Leipertz, Steve L.; Sloan, Alicia P.; Whitham, Ruth; Haselkorn, Jodie K.

In: PM and R, Vol. 5, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 1044-1050.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turner, AP, Chapko, MK, Yanez, N, Leipertz, SL, Sloan, AP, Whitham, R & Haselkorn, JK 2013, 'Access to multiple sclerosis specialty care', PM and R, vol. 5, no. 12, pp. 1044-1050. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.07.009
Turner AP, Chapko MK, Yanez N, Leipertz SL, Sloan AP, Whitham R et al. Access to multiple sclerosis specialty care. PM and R. 2013 Dec;5(12):1044-1050. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.07.009
Turner, Aaron P. ; Chapko, Michael K. ; Yanez, Norbert ; Leipertz, Steve L. ; Sloan, Alicia P. ; Whitham, Ruth ; Haselkorn, Jodie K. / Access to multiple sclerosis specialty care. In: PM and R. 2013 ; Vol. 5, No. 12. pp. 1044-1050.
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