A WAVE-1 and WRP signaling complex regulates spine density, synaptic plasticity, and memory

Scott H. Soderling, Eric S. Guire, Stefanie Kaech, Jon White, Fang Zhang, Kevin Schutz, Lorene K. Langeberg, Gary Banker, Jacob Raber, John D. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

146 Scopus citations

Abstract

The scaffolding protein WAVE-1 (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family member 1) directs signals from the GTPase Rac through the Arp2/3 complex to facilitate neuronal actin remodeling. The WAVE-associated GTPase activating protein called WRP is implicated in human mental retardation, and WAVE-1 knock-out mice have altered behavior. Neuronal time-lapse imaging, behavioral analyses, and electrophysiological recordings from genetically modified mice were used to show that WAVE-1 signaling complexes control aspects of neuronal morphogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Gene targeting experiments in mice demonstrate that WRP anchoring to WAVE-1 is a homeostatic mechanism that contributes to neuronal development and the fidelity of synaptic connectivity. This implies that signaling through WAVE-1 complexes is essential for neural plasticity and cognitive behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-365
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2007

Keywords

  • Actin
  • Arp2/3
  • Dendritic spine
  • Synaptic plasticity
  • WAVE-1
  • WRP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Soderling, S. H., Guire, E. S., Kaech, S., White, J., Zhang, F., Schutz, K., Langeberg, L. K., Banker, G., Raber, J., & Scott, J. D. (2007). A WAVE-1 and WRP signaling complex regulates spine density, synaptic plasticity, and memory. Journal of Neuroscience, 27(2), 355-365. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3209-06.2006