A Walk (or Cycle) to the Park. Active Transit to Neighborhood Amenities, the CARDIA Study

Janne Heinonen, David R. Jacobs, Stephen Sidney, Barbara Sternfeld, Cora E. Lewis, Penny Gordon-Larsen

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Building on known associations between active commuting and reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, this study examines active transit to neighborhood amenities and differences between walking and cycling for transportation. Methods: Year-20 data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (3549 black and white adults aged 38-50 years in 2005-2006) were analyzed in 2008-2009. Sociodemographic correlates of transportation mode (car-only, walk-only, any cycling, other) to neighborhood amenities were examined in multivariable multinomial logistic models. Gender-stratified multivariable linear or multinomial regression models compared CVD risk factors across transit modes. Results: Active transit was most common to parks and public transit stops; walking was more common than cycling. Among those who used each amenity, active transit (walk-only and any cycling versus car-only transit) was more common in men and those with no live-in partner and less than full-time employment (significant ORs [95% CI] ranging from 1.56 [1.08, 2.27] to 4.54 [1.70, 12.14]), and less common in those with children. Active transit to any neighborhood amenity was associated with more favorable BMI, waist circumference, and fitness (largest coefficient [95% CI] -1.68 [-2.81, -0.55] for BMI, -3.41 [-5.71, -1.11] for waist circumference [cm], and 36.65 [17.99, 55.31] for treadmill test duration [seconds]). Only cycling was associated with lower lifetime CVD risk classification. Conclusions: Active transit to neighborhood amenities was related to sociodemographics and CVD risk factors. Variation in health-related benefits by active transit mode, if validated in prospective studies, may have implications for transportation planning and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-292
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

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