A value framework for cancer screening: Advice for high-value care from the American college of physicians

High Value Care Task Force of the American College of Physicians

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experts, professional societies, and consumer groups often recommend different strategies for cancer screening. These strategies vary in the intensity of their search for asymptomatic lesions and in their value. This article outlines a framework for thinking about the value of varying intensities of cancer screening. The authors conclude that increasing intensity beyond an optimal level leads to low-value screening and speculate about pressures that encourage overly intensive, low-value screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-717
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume162
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Early Detection of Cancer
Physicians
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A value framework for cancer screening : Advice for high-value care from the American college of physicians. / High Value Care Task Force of the American College of Physicians.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 162, No. 10, 2015, p. 712-717.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

High Value Care Task Force of the American College of Physicians. / A value framework for cancer screening : Advice for high-value care from the American college of physicians. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 162, No. 10. pp. 712-717.
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