A tri-institutional comparison of tissue and mechanical valves using a patient-oriented definition of 'treatment failure'

A. Cobanoglu, W. R E Jamieson, D. C. Miller, C. McKinley, G. L. Grunkemeier, H. S. Floten, R. T. Miyagishima, G. F. Tyers, N. E. Shumway, Albert Starr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Selection of valve type for predominant usage is obscured by limiting the analysis to prosthesis-related rather than patient-oriented failure modes. In this report, 'treatment failure' is defined as a valve-related death or permanent patient disability; successful reoperations are excluded, and emboli with permanent residua are included. Results with the Starr-Edwards Silastic ball valve (Oregon) and the Hancock (Stanford) and Carpentier-Edwards (Vancouver) porcine valves are compared using this new definition of treatment failure. Evaluated according to structural failure, the mechanical valve is superior to the tissue valve, and using the Stanford definition of valve failure, it becomes so between 5 and 10 years. Using treatment failure, tissue valves are superior at 5 years; at 10 years in the aortic position, the results are comparable; and in the mitral position at 8 to 10 years, tissue valves show a continued but small advantage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-253
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

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Treatment Failure
Embolism
Reoperation
Prostheses and Implants
Swine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Cobanoglu, A., Jamieson, W. R. E., Miller, D. C., McKinley, C., Grunkemeier, G. L., Floten, H. S., ... Starr, A. (1987). A tri-institutional comparison of tissue and mechanical valves using a patient-oriented definition of 'treatment failure'. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 43(3), 245-253. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4975(10)60606-6

A tri-institutional comparison of tissue and mechanical valves using a patient-oriented definition of 'treatment failure'. / Cobanoglu, A.; Jamieson, W. R E; Miller, D. C.; McKinley, C.; Grunkemeier, G. L.; Floten, H. S.; Miyagishima, R. T.; Tyers, G. F.; Shumway, N. E.; Starr, Albert.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 43, No. 3, 1987, p. 245-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cobanoglu, A, Jamieson, WRE, Miller, DC, McKinley, C, Grunkemeier, GL, Floten, HS, Miyagishima, RT, Tyers, GF, Shumway, NE & Starr, A 1987, 'A tri-institutional comparison of tissue and mechanical valves using a patient-oriented definition of 'treatment failure'', Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol. 43, no. 3, pp. 245-253. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4975(10)60606-6
Cobanoglu, A. ; Jamieson, W. R E ; Miller, D. C. ; McKinley, C. ; Grunkemeier, G. L. ; Floten, H. S. ; Miyagishima, R. T. ; Tyers, G. F. ; Shumway, N. E. ; Starr, Albert. / A tri-institutional comparison of tissue and mechanical valves using a patient-oriented definition of 'treatment failure'. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1987 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 245-253.
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