A training intervention for supervisors to support a work-life policy implementation

Naima Laharnar, Nancy Glass, Nancy Perrin, Ginger Hanson, Wyndham Anger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Effective policy implementation is essential for a healthy workplace. The Ryan-Kossek 2008 model for work-life policy adoption suggests that supervisors as gatekeepers between employer and employee need to know how to support and communicate benefit regulations. This article describes a workplace intervention on a national employee benefit, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and evaluates the effectiveness of the intervention on supervisor knowledge, awareness, and experience with FMLA. Methods The intervention consisted of computer-based training (CBT) and a survey measuring awareness and experience with FMLA. The training was administered to 793 county government supervisors in the state of Oregon, USA. Results More than 35% of supervisors reported no previous training on FMLA and the training pre-test revealed a lack of knowledge regarding benefit coverage and employer responsibilities. The CBT achieved: (1) a significant learning effect and large effect size of d = 2.0, (2) a positive reaction to the training and its design, and (3) evidence of increased knowledge and awareness regarding FMLA. Conclusion CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-176
Number of pages11
JournalSafety and Health at Work
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Family Leave
policy implementation
Supervisory personnel
act
Workplace
employee
Personnel
workplace
supplementary qualification
employer
Local Government
learning success
gatekeeper
lack
know how
Learning
Organizations
experience
coverage

Keywords

  • benefit
  • evaluation
  • intervention
  • policy
  • training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Chemical Health and Safety
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research

Cite this

A training intervention for supervisors to support a work-life policy implementation. / Laharnar, Naima; Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Anger, Wyndham.

In: Safety and Health at Work, Vol. 4, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 166-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laharnar, Naima ; Glass, Nancy ; Perrin, Nancy ; Hanson, Ginger ; Anger, Wyndham. / A training intervention for supervisors to support a work-life policy implementation. In: Safety and Health at Work. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 166-176.
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