A single-day paradigm of self-regulated human cocaine administration

D. Matuskey, B. Pittman, Jason Chen, J. Wanyiri, H. Nadim, P. Jatlow, R. Gueorguieva, M. N. Potenza, P. T. Morgan, Z. Bhagwagar, R. T. Malison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior work by our group has shown the feasibility, safety, and validity of a multi-day, multi-dose paradigm of self-regulated cocaine administration in humans. The current work sought to consolidate these methods in a single-day design focused on reducing logistical complexity, decreasing research burden to human subjects, and increasing suitability for medication development designs. Methods: Eleven experienced cocaine users participated in a 6-hour, single-day design, consisting of one safety/eligibility and three experimental cocaine periods (during which subjects were allowed to self-administer 8, 16, and 32 mg/70 kg cocaine doses under a fixed-ratio 1:5 minute timeout schedule). Changes in cocaine-induced cardiovascular response, self-administration behavior, and subjective effects were assessed. Results: Procedures were well tolerated by participants, and no significant adverse events were noted. Significant (p < 0.05), changes in measures of cocaine self-administration (e.g., responses, infusions, interinfusion intervals, consumption, and plasma levels), cardiovascular response (HR), and subjective effects (high) were observed. In contrast, cocaine-induced increases in other vital signs (e.g., SBP, DBP) and subjective effect measures (e.g., paranoia) did not differ between doses. Conclusions: These data support the safety, tolerability and validity of our single-day design. Depending on the application, such methods may afford advantages for assessing the self-regulation of cocaine administration behavior in humans (e.g., including medication development designs).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cocaine
Self Administration
Safety
Paranoid Disorders
Vital Signs
Appointments and Schedules
Plasmas
Research

Keywords

  • Cocaine plasma levels
  • Cocaine self-administration
  • Human studies
  • Self-regulation
  • Subjective effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Matuskey, D., Pittman, B., Chen, J., Wanyiri, J., Nadim, H., Jatlow, P., ... Malison, R. T. (2012). A single-day paradigm of self-regulated human cocaine administration. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 103(1), 95-101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2012.08.009

A single-day paradigm of self-regulated human cocaine administration. / Matuskey, D.; Pittman, B.; Chen, Jason; Wanyiri, J.; Nadim, H.; Jatlow, P.; Gueorguieva, R.; Potenza, M. N.; Morgan, P. T.; Bhagwagar, Z.; Malison, R. T.

In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 103, No. 1, 01.11.2012, p. 95-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matuskey, D, Pittman, B, Chen, J, Wanyiri, J, Nadim, H, Jatlow, P, Gueorguieva, R, Potenza, MN, Morgan, PT, Bhagwagar, Z & Malison, RT 2012, 'A single-day paradigm of self-regulated human cocaine administration', Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 103, no. 1, pp. 95-101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2012.08.009
Matuskey, D. ; Pittman, B. ; Chen, Jason ; Wanyiri, J. ; Nadim, H. ; Jatlow, P. ; Gueorguieva, R. ; Potenza, M. N. ; Morgan, P. T. ; Bhagwagar, Z. ; Malison, R. T. / A single-day paradigm of self-regulated human cocaine administration. In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 2012 ; Vol. 103, No. 1. pp. 95-101.
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