A sea of standards for omics data: Sink or swim?

Jessica D. Tenenbaum, Susanna Assunta Sansone, Melissa Haendel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the era of Big Data, omic-scale technologies, and increasing calls for data sharing, it is generally agreed that the use of community-developed, open data standards is critical. Far less agreed upon is exactly which data standards should be used, the criteria by which one should choose a standard, or even what constitutes a data standard. It is impossible simply to choose a domain and have it naturally follow which data standards should be used in all cases. The 'right' standards to use is often dependent on the use case scenarios for a given project. Potential downstream applications for the data, however, may not always be apparent at the time the data are generated. Similarly, technology evolves, adding further complexity. Would-be standards adopters must strike a balance between planning for the future and minimizing the burden of compliance. Better tools and resources are required to help guide this balancing act.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-203
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Technology
Information Dissemination
Compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

A sea of standards for omics data : Sink or swim? / Tenenbaum, Jessica D.; Sansone, Susanna Assunta; Haendel, Melissa.

In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2014, p. 200-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tenenbaum, Jessica D. ; Sansone, Susanna Assunta ; Haendel, Melissa. / A sea of standards for omics data : Sink or swim?. In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 200-203.
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