A randomized controlled trial to assess decay in acquired knowledge among paramedics completing a pediatric resuscitation course

Eustacia Su, Terri Schmidt, N. Clay Mann, Andrew D. Zechnich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Critical pediatric illness or injury occurs infrequently in out-of-hospital settings, making it difficult for paramedics to maintain physical assessment, treatment, and procedure skills. Objectives: To document the ability of paramedics to retain clinical knowledge over a one-year interval after completing a pediatric resuscitation course and to determine whether clinical experience or retesting improves retention. Methods: This was a randomized controlled study assessing retention of knowledge in pediatric resuscitation soon after, six months after, and 12 months following completion of a pediatric advanced life support course. Forty-three paramedics participated in pre- and post-pediatric resuscitation course testing and were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Group 1 received a knowledge examination (KE) and mock resuscitation scenarios (MR) at six months. Group 2 received only the KE at six months. Group 3 received the MR only at six months. Group 4 received no intermediate testing. All groups were reassessed at 12 months. Results: Pediatric clinical knowledge (as measured by KE) rose sharply immediately after the course but returned to baseline levels within six months. There was no difference between the groups in knowledge scores at 12 months, despite the interventions at six months. Conclusions: Although intensive out-of-hospital pediatric education enhances knowledge, that knowledge rapidly decays. Emergency medical services programs need to find novel ways to increase retention and ensure paramedic readiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-786
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume7
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2000

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Allied Health Personnel
Resuscitation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pediatrics
Pediatric Hospitals
Emergency Medical Services
Critical Illness
Education
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Children
  • Emergency medical services
  • EMS
  • Paramedic
  • Pediatric
  • Resuscitation
  • Skills
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

A randomized controlled trial to assess decay in acquired knowledge among paramedics completing a pediatric resuscitation course. / Su, Eustacia; Schmidt, Terri; Mann, N. Clay; Zechnich, Andrew D.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 7, 07.2000, p. 779-786.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Su, Eustacia ; Schmidt, Terri ; Mann, N. Clay ; Zechnich, Andrew D. / A randomized controlled trial to assess decay in acquired knowledge among paramedics completing a pediatric resuscitation course. In: Academic Emergency Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 7, No. 7. pp. 779-786.
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