A Quick Guide for Building a Successful Bioinformatics Community

Aidan Budd, Manuel Corpas, Michelle D. Brazas, Jonathan C. Fuller, Jeremy Goecks, Nicola J. Mulder, Magali Michaut, B. F.Francis Ouellette, Aleksandra Pawlik, Niklas Blomberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

“Scientific community” refers to a group of people collaborating together on scientific-research-related activities who also share common goals, interests, and values. Such communities play a key role in many bioinformatics activities. Communities may be linked to a specific location or institute, or involve people working at many different institutions and locations. Education and training is typically an important component of these communities, providing a valuable context in which to develop skills and expertise, while also strengthening links and relationships within the community. Scientific communities facilitate: (i) the exchange and development of ideas and expertise; (ii) career development; (iii) coordinated funding activities; (iv) interactions and engagement with professionals from other fields; and (v) other activities beneficial to individual participants, communities, and the scientific field as a whole. It is thus beneficial at many different levels to understand the general features of successful, high-impact bioinformatics communities; how individual participants can contribute to the success of these communities; and the role of education and training within these communities. We present here a quick guide to building and maintaining a successful, high-impact bioinformatics community, along with an overview of the general benefits of participating in such communities. This article grew out of contributions made by organizers, presenters, panelists, and other participants of the ISMB/ECCB 2013 workshop “The ‘How To Guide’ for Establishing a Successful Bioinformatics Network” at the 21st Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) and the 12th European Conference on Computational Biology (ECCB).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1003972
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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bioinformatics
Bioinformatics
Computational Biology
Molecular biology
education and training
Intelligent systems
Systems Biology
artificial intelligence
Education
molecular biology
Molecular Biology
education
career development
Intelligent Systems
Expertise
funding
Community
Strengthening
Research
Annual

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Budd, A., Corpas, M., Brazas, M. D., Fuller, J. C., Goecks, J., Mulder, N. J., ... Blomberg, N. (2015). A Quick Guide for Building a Successful Bioinformatics Community. PLoS Computational Biology, 11(2), [e1003972]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003972

A Quick Guide for Building a Successful Bioinformatics Community. / Budd, Aidan; Corpas, Manuel; Brazas, Michelle D.; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Goecks, Jeremy; Mulder, Nicola J.; Michaut, Magali; Ouellette, B. F.Francis; Pawlik, Aleksandra; Blomberg, Niklas.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 11, No. 2, e1003972, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Budd, A, Corpas, M, Brazas, MD, Fuller, JC, Goecks, J, Mulder, NJ, Michaut, M, Ouellette, BFF, Pawlik, A & Blomberg, N 2015, 'A Quick Guide for Building a Successful Bioinformatics Community', PLoS Computational Biology, vol. 11, no. 2, e1003972. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003972
Budd, Aidan ; Corpas, Manuel ; Brazas, Michelle D. ; Fuller, Jonathan C. ; Goecks, Jeremy ; Mulder, Nicola J. ; Michaut, Magali ; Ouellette, B. F.Francis ; Pawlik, Aleksandra ; Blomberg, Niklas. / A Quick Guide for Building a Successful Bioinformatics Community. In: PLoS Computational Biology. 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. 2.
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