A protein synthesis-dependent mechanism sustains calcium-permeable AMPA receptor transmission in nucleus accumbens synapses during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration

Andrew F. Scheyer, Marina Wolf, Kuei Y. Tseng

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29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extended-access cocaine self-administration results in withdrawal-dependent incubation of cocaine craving. Rats evaluated after ~1 month of withdrawal from such regimens ("incubated rats") exhibit changes in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that include accumulation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) and a switch in group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated suppression of synaptic transmission from mGluR5-dependent to mGluR1-dependent. To determine the role of protein synthesis in mediating these adaptations, we conducted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in NAc core MSNs of "incubated rats" in the presence of translational inhibitors (anisomycin, cycloheximide, rapamycin) or the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D. The contribution of CP-AMPARs to synaptic transmission was determined by the rectification index and the sensitivity to the CP-AMPAR antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine. We found that CP-AMPAR-mediated transmission in the NAc of "incubated rats" was reduced to levels comparable to those found in saline control rats when brain slices were treated with translational inhibitors, whereas actinomycin-D had no effect. We also investigated the effect of protein translation inhibitors on the switch of mGluR function in MSNs of "incubated rats" using the group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in combination with either an mGluR1 (LY367385) or an mGluR5 (3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine) antagonist. Data revealed that inhibition of protein translation eliminated the mGluR1-mediated inhibition and restored the mGluR5 responsiveness to a state functionally similar to that of saline control rats. Together, these results suggest that aberrant regulation of local protein synthesis contributes to the maintenance of adaptations accrued at NAc MSN synapses during incubation of cocaine craving.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3095-3100
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 25 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Administration
AMPA Receptors
Nucleus Accumbens
Cocaine
Synapses
Calcium
Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors
Proteins
Neurons
Protein Biosynthesis
Dactinomycin
Synaptic Transmission
alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine
Anisomycin
Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists
Sirolimus
Cycloheximide
Maintenance
Brain
metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Medium spiny neurons
  • MGluR
  • Synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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title = "A protein synthesis-dependent mechanism sustains calcium-permeable AMPA receptor transmission in nucleus accumbens synapses during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration",
abstract = "Extended-access cocaine self-administration results in withdrawal-dependent incubation of cocaine craving. Rats evaluated after ~1 month of withdrawal from such regimens ({"}incubated rats{"}) exhibit changes in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that include accumulation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) and a switch in group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated suppression of synaptic transmission from mGluR5-dependent to mGluR1-dependent. To determine the role of protein synthesis in mediating these adaptations, we conducted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in NAc core MSNs of {"}incubated rats{"} in the presence of translational inhibitors (anisomycin, cycloheximide, rapamycin) or the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D. The contribution of CP-AMPARs to synaptic transmission was determined by the rectification index and the sensitivity to the CP-AMPAR antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine. We found that CP-AMPAR-mediated transmission in the NAc of {"}incubated rats{"} was reduced to levels comparable to those found in saline control rats when brain slices were treated with translational inhibitors, whereas actinomycin-D had no effect. We also investigated the effect of protein translation inhibitors on the switch of mGluR function in MSNs of {"}incubated rats{"} using the group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in combination with either an mGluR1 (LY367385) or an mGluR5 (3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine) antagonist. Data revealed that inhibition of protein translation eliminated the mGluR1-mediated inhibition and restored the mGluR5 responsiveness to a state functionally similar to that of saline control rats. Together, these results suggest that aberrant regulation of local protein synthesis contributes to the maintenance of adaptations accrued at NAc MSN synapses during incubation of cocaine craving.",
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T1 - A protein synthesis-dependent mechanism sustains calcium-permeable AMPA receptor transmission in nucleus accumbens synapses during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration

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AU - Wolf, Marina

AU - Tseng, Kuei Y.

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N2 - Extended-access cocaine self-administration results in withdrawal-dependent incubation of cocaine craving. Rats evaluated after ~1 month of withdrawal from such regimens ("incubated rats") exhibit changes in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that include accumulation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) and a switch in group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated suppression of synaptic transmission from mGluR5-dependent to mGluR1-dependent. To determine the role of protein synthesis in mediating these adaptations, we conducted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in NAc core MSNs of "incubated rats" in the presence of translational inhibitors (anisomycin, cycloheximide, rapamycin) or the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D. The contribution of CP-AMPARs to synaptic transmission was determined by the rectification index and the sensitivity to the CP-AMPAR antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine. We found that CP-AMPAR-mediated transmission in the NAc of "incubated rats" was reduced to levels comparable to those found in saline control rats when brain slices were treated with translational inhibitors, whereas actinomycin-D had no effect. We also investigated the effect of protein translation inhibitors on the switch of mGluR function in MSNs of "incubated rats" using the group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in combination with either an mGluR1 (LY367385) or an mGluR5 (3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine) antagonist. Data revealed that inhibition of protein translation eliminated the mGluR1-mediated inhibition and restored the mGluR5 responsiveness to a state functionally similar to that of saline control rats. Together, these results suggest that aberrant regulation of local protein synthesis contributes to the maintenance of adaptations accrued at NAc MSN synapses during incubation of cocaine craving.

AB - Extended-access cocaine self-administration results in withdrawal-dependent incubation of cocaine craving. Rats evaluated after ~1 month of withdrawal from such regimens ("incubated rats") exhibit changes in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that include accumulation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) and a switch in group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated suppression of synaptic transmission from mGluR5-dependent to mGluR1-dependent. To determine the role of protein synthesis in mediating these adaptations, we conducted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in NAc core MSNs of "incubated rats" in the presence of translational inhibitors (anisomycin, cycloheximide, rapamycin) or the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D. The contribution of CP-AMPARs to synaptic transmission was determined by the rectification index and the sensitivity to the CP-AMPAR antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine. We found that CP-AMPAR-mediated transmission in the NAc of "incubated rats" was reduced to levels comparable to those found in saline control rats when brain slices were treated with translational inhibitors, whereas actinomycin-D had no effect. We also investigated the effect of protein translation inhibitors on the switch of mGluR function in MSNs of "incubated rats" using the group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in combination with either an mGluR1 (LY367385) or an mGluR5 (3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine) antagonist. Data revealed that inhibition of protein translation eliminated the mGluR1-mediated inhibition and restored the mGluR5 responsiveness to a state functionally similar to that of saline control rats. Together, these results suggest that aberrant regulation of local protein synthesis contributes to the maintenance of adaptations accrued at NAc MSN synapses during incubation of cocaine craving.

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