A preliminary study of functional magnetic resonance imaging response during verbal encoding among adolescent binge drinkers

Alecia D. Schweinsburg, Tim McQueeny, Bonnie Nagel, Lisa T. Eyler, Susan F. Tapert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Binge alcohol use is common among teenagers with 28% of 12th graders reporting getting drunk in the past month. Chronic heavy drinking has been associated with verbal learning and memory deficits in adolescents and adults, yet verbal encoding in less frequently drinking teens has not yet been studied. Here, we examined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response during verbal encoding among adolescent binge drinkers. Participants recruited from local high schools were of ages 16-18 and consisted of 12 binge drinkers and 12 demographically similar nondrinkers. Participants were all nonsmokers, and drinkers were abstinent from alcohol for an average of 33 days at the time of scanning. Participants performed a verbal paired associates learning task during fMRI acquisition. Drinkers recalled marginally fewer words than nondrinkers (P=.07). Compared with nondrinkers, bingers showed more response in right superior frontal and bilateral posterior parietal cortices but less response in occipital cortex during novel encoding (Ps < .05, clusters >1,512μL). In addition, controls showed significant activation in the left hippocampus during novel encoding, whereas binge drinkers did not. Adolescent binge drinkers demonstrated (1) more response than nondrinkers in frontal and parietal regions, which could suggest greater engagement of working memory systems during encoding; (2) no hippocampal activation to novel word pairs; and (3) slightly poorer word pair recall, which could indicate disadvantaged processing of novel verbal information and a slower learning slope. Longitudinal studies will be needed to ascertain the degree to which emergence of binge drinking is linked temporally to these brain response patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-117
Number of pages7
JournalAlcohol
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Chemical activation
Alcohols
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
adolescent
Data storage equipment
Verbal Learning
Parietal Lobe
activation
alcohol
learning
Brain
Paired-Associate Learning
Scanning
Binge Drinking
Occipital Lobe
longitudinal study
Memory Disorders
brain
deficit
Vulnerable Populations

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol
  • Functional MRI
  • Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

A preliminary study of functional magnetic resonance imaging response during verbal encoding among adolescent binge drinkers. / Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; McQueeny, Tim; Nagel, Bonnie; Eyler, Lisa T.; Tapert, Susan F.

In: Alcohol, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 111-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schweinsburg, Alecia D. ; McQueeny, Tim ; Nagel, Bonnie ; Eyler, Lisa T. ; Tapert, Susan F. / A preliminary study of functional magnetic resonance imaging response during verbal encoding among adolescent binge drinkers. In: Alcohol. 2010 ; Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 111-117.
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