A preliminary report of the occupation of patients evaluated in patch test clinics

Robert L. Rietschel, C. G Toby Mathias, James S. Taylor, Frances Storrs, Elizabeth F. Sherertz, Melanie Pratt, James G. Marks, Howard I. Maibach, Anthony F. Fransway, Joseph F. Fowler, Vincent A. DeLeo, Donald V. Belsito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The interplay between the occupational environment and worker's skin can result in contact dermatitis of both irritant and allergic types. Other forms of dermatitis can also be influenced by occupational exposures. Objective: The aim of this study is to compare the occupations and allergens of occupational contact dermatitis cases with nonoccupational contact dermatitis cases. Methods: Diagnostic patch testing with allergens of the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and occupational coding by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health methods. Results: Of 2,889 patients referred for evaluation of contact dermatitis, 839 patients (29%) were found to have occupational contact dermatitis. Of the 839 cases deemed occupational, 455 cases (54%) were primarily allergic in nature and 270 cases (32%) were primarily irritant in nature. The remaining 14% were diagnoses other than contact dermatitis, aggravated by work. The occupation most commonly found to have allergic contact dermatitis was nursing. Allergens strongly associated with occupational exposure were thiuram, carbamates, epoxy, and ethylenediamine. Conclusion: Some contact allergens are more commonly associated with occupational contact dermatitis. Nursing and nursing support are occupations most likely to be overrepresented in contact dermatitis clinics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-76
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Contact Dermatitis
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patch Tests
Contact Dermatitis
Occupations
Occupational Dermatitis
Allergens
ethylenediamine
Nursing
Irritants
Occupational Exposure
Thiram
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.)
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Carbamates
Dermatitis
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Rietschel, R. L., Mathias, C. G. T., Taylor, J. S., Storrs, F., Sherertz, E. F., Pratt, M., ... Belsito, D. V. (2001). A preliminary report of the occupation of patients evaluated in patch test clinics. American Journal of Contact Dermatitis, 12(2), 72-76. https://doi.org/10.1053/ajcd.2001.19630

A preliminary report of the occupation of patients evaluated in patch test clinics. / Rietschel, Robert L.; Mathias, C. G Toby; Taylor, James S.; Storrs, Frances; Sherertz, Elizabeth F.; Pratt, Melanie; Marks, James G.; Maibach, Howard I.; Fransway, Anthony F.; Fowler, Joseph F.; DeLeo, Vincent A.; Belsito, Donald V.

In: American Journal of Contact Dermatitis, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2001, p. 72-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rietschel, RL, Mathias, CGT, Taylor, JS, Storrs, F, Sherertz, EF, Pratt, M, Marks, JG, Maibach, HI, Fransway, AF, Fowler, JF, DeLeo, VA & Belsito, DV 2001, 'A preliminary report of the occupation of patients evaluated in patch test clinics', American Journal of Contact Dermatitis, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 72-76. https://doi.org/10.1053/ajcd.2001.19630
Rietschel, Robert L. ; Mathias, C. G Toby ; Taylor, James S. ; Storrs, Frances ; Sherertz, Elizabeth F. ; Pratt, Melanie ; Marks, James G. ; Maibach, Howard I. ; Fransway, Anthony F. ; Fowler, Joseph F. ; DeLeo, Vincent A. ; Belsito, Donald V. / A preliminary report of the occupation of patients evaluated in patch test clinics. In: American Journal of Contact Dermatitis. 2001 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 72-76.
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