A predictive model of early mortality in trauma patients

David A. Hampton, Tim H. Lee, Brian S. Diggs, Sean P. McCully, Martin Schreiber

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Rapid thrombelastography (rTEG) is a real-time whole-blood viscoelastic coagulation assay. We hypothesized that admission rTEG and clinical data are independent predictors of trauma-related mortality. Methods: Prospective observational data (patient demographics, admission vital signs, laboratory studies, and injury characteristics) from trauma patients enrolled within 6 hours of injury were collected. Mann-Whitney U test and analysis of variance test assessed significance (P ≤.05). Logistic regression analyses determined the association of the studied variables with 24-hour mortality. Results: Seven hundred ninety-five trauma patients were enrolled, of which 55 died within 24 hours of admission. Admission variables which independently predicted 24-hour mortality were as follows: Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8, hemoglobin 1.5, Ly30 >8%, and penetrating injury (P

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)642-647
    Number of pages6
    JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
    Volume207
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Mortality
    Wounds and Injuries
    Thrombelastography
    Whole Blood Coagulation Time
    Glasgow Coma Scale
    Vital Signs
    Patient Admission
    Nonparametric Statistics
    Analysis of Variance
    Hemoglobins
    Logistic Models
    Regression Analysis
    Demography

    Keywords

    • Model
    • Mortality
    • Thrombelastography
    • Trauma

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    A predictive model of early mortality in trauma patients. / Hampton, David A.; Lee, Tim H.; Diggs, Brian S.; McCully, Sean P.; Schreiber, Martin.

    In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 207, No. 5, 2014, p. 642-647.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hampton, David A. ; Lee, Tim H. ; Diggs, Brian S. ; McCully, Sean P. ; Schreiber, Martin. / A predictive model of early mortality in trauma patients. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 207, No. 5. pp. 642-647.
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