A physiological barrier distal to the anatomic blood-brain barrier in a model of transvascular delivery

Leslie Muldoon, Michael A. Pagel, Robert A. Kroll, Simon Roman-Goldstein, Russell S. Jones, Edward Neuwelt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) provides a method for transvascular delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain. The apparent global delivery of viral-sized iron oxide particles to the rat brain after BBB opening as seen on MR images was compared with the cellular and subcellular location and distribution of the particles. METHODS: Two dextran-coated superparamagnetic monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticle contrast agents, MION and Feridex, were administered intraarterially in rats at 10 mg Fe/kg immediately after osmotic opening of the BBB with hyperosmolar mannitol. After 2 to 24 hours, iron distribution in the brain was evaluated first with MR imaging then by histochemical analysis and electron microscopy to assess perivascular and intracellular distribution. RESULTS: After BBB opening, MR images showed enhancement throughout the disrupted hemisphere for both Feridex and MION. Feridex histochemical staining was found in capillaries of the disrupted hemisphere. Electron microscopy showed that the Feridex particles passed the capillary endothelial cells but did not cross beyond the basement membrane. In contrast, after MION delivery, iron histochemistry was detected within cell bodies in the disrupted hemisphere, and the electron-dense MION core was detected intracellularly and extracellularly in the neuropil. CONCLUSION: MR images showing homogeneous delivery to the brain at the macroscopic level did not indicate delivery at the microscopic level. These data support the presence of a physiological barrier at the basal lamina, analogous to the podocyte in the kidney, distal to the anatomic (tight junction) BBB, which may limit the distribution of some proteins and viral particles after transvascular delivery to the brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-222
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume20
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Blood-Brain Barrier
Brain
Basement Membrane
Electron Microscopy
Iron
Image Enhancement
Podocytes
Neuropil
Tight Junctions
Mannitol
Virion
Contrast Media
Endothelial Cells
monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticle
ferumoxides
Electrons
Staining and Labeling
Kidney
Proteins
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

A physiological barrier distal to the anatomic blood-brain barrier in a model of transvascular delivery. / Muldoon, Leslie; Pagel, Michael A.; Kroll, Robert A.; Roman-Goldstein, Simon; Jones, Russell S.; Neuwelt, Edward.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 20, No. 2, 1999, p. 217-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muldoon, Leslie ; Pagel, Michael A. ; Kroll, Robert A. ; Roman-Goldstein, Simon ; Jones, Russell S. ; Neuwelt, Edward. / A physiological barrier distal to the anatomic blood-brain barrier in a model of transvascular delivery. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 1999 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 217-222.
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