A parental history of asthma is a risk factor for wheezing and nonwheezing respiratory illnesses in infants younger than 18 months of age

Carol H. Bosken, William C. Hunt, William Lambert, Jonathan M. Samet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between respiratory infection and allergy as risk factors for the development of wheezing illnesses in infants has been in dispute. We hypothesized that a parental history of allergic diseases would be associated with an increased rate of respiratory infections as well as an increased rate of wheezing during infectious episodes. We prospectively evaluated 1,193 infants from birth to 18 mo of age, using bi-weekly telephone surveillance to document all respiratory events. The overall rate of respiratory illness (all RI) increased to a maximum of 10.6 illnesses/infant/year in the 7- to 9-mo age group and then leveled off in the older infants. Multivariable models adjusting for demographic variables, breast feeding, month of illness, number of siblings, and attendance at day care showed an increase in the rate of all RI in infants older than 7 mo of age who had a parental history of asthma (OR = 1.24, CI = 1.09 to 1.41) or a parental history of atopy (OR = 1.14, CI = 1.03 to 1.26). The rate of lower respiratory illnesses accompanied by wheezing was related only to a parental history of asthma (OR = 2.06, CI = 1.36 to 3.11). We conclude that all RI, most of which represent vital infections, are increased in otherwise normal infants with a parental history of asthma or atopy, whereas wheezing is related only to a parental history of asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1810-1815
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume161
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Respiratory Sounds
Asthma
Respiratory Rate
Respiratory Tract Infections
Dissent and Disputes
Breast Feeding
Telephone
Siblings
Hypersensitivity
Age Groups
Demography
Parturition
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

A parental history of asthma is a risk factor for wheezing and nonwheezing respiratory illnesses in infants younger than 18 months of age. / Bosken, Carol H.; Hunt, William C.; Lambert, William; Samet, Jonathan M.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 161, No. 6, 2000, p. 1810-1815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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