A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine

Guillaume L. Hoareau, Harris Kashtan, Lauren E. Walker, Carl Beyer, Andrew Wishy, J. Kevin Grayson, James Ross, Ian J. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The standard of care for refractory hyperkalemia is renal replacement therapy (RRT). However, traditional RRT requires specialized equipment, trained personnel, and large amounts of dialysate. It is therefore poorly suited for austere environments. We hypothesized that a simplified hemoperfusion system could control serum potassium concentration in a swine model of acute hyperkalemia. METHODS: Ten pigs were anesthetized and instrumented. A dialysis catheter was inserted. After bilateral nephrectomy, animals received intravenous potassium chloride and were randomized to the control or treatment group. In both groups, blood was pumped through an extracorporeal circuit (EC) with an in-line hemodialyzer. In the treatment arm, ultrafiltrate from the hemodialyzer was diverted through cartridges containing novel potassium binding beads and returned to the EC. Blood samples were obtained every 30 min for 6 h. RESULTS: Serum potassium concentration was significantly lower in the treatment than in the control group over time (P = 0.02). There was no difference in serum total calcium concentration for group or time (P = 0.13 and 0.44, respectively) or platelet count between groups or over time (P = 0.28 and 1, respectively). No significant EC thrombosis occurred. Two of five animals in the control group and none in the treatment group developed arrhythmias. All animals survived until end of experiment. CONCLUSIONS: A simplified hemoperfusion system removed potassium in a porcine model. In austere settings, this system could be used to temporize patients with hyperkalemia until evacuation to a facility with traditional RRT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-683
Number of pages7
JournalShock (Augusta, Ga.)
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Hyperkalemia
Renal Replacement Therapy
Potassium
Swine
Perfusion
Artificial Kidneys
Hemoperfusion
Serum
Control Groups
Potassium Chloride
Dialysis Solutions
Therapeutics
Standard of Care
Blood Group Antigens
Nephrectomy
Platelet Count
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Dialysis
Thrombosis
Catheters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Hoareau, G. L., Kashtan, H., Walker, L. E., Beyer, C., Wishy, A., Grayson, J. K., ... Stewart, I. J. (2018). A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine. Shock (Augusta, Ga.), 50(6), 677-683. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001079

A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine. / Hoareau, Guillaume L.; Kashtan, Harris; Walker, Lauren E.; Beyer, Carl; Wishy, Andrew; Grayson, J. Kevin; Ross, James; Stewart, Ian J.

In: Shock (Augusta, Ga.), Vol. 50, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. 677-683.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoareau, GL, Kashtan, H, Walker, LE, Beyer, C, Wishy, A, Grayson, JK, Ross, J & Stewart, IJ 2018, 'A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine', Shock (Augusta, Ga.), vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 677-683. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001079
Hoareau GL, Kashtan H, Walker LE, Beyer C, Wishy A, Grayson JK et al. A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine. Shock (Augusta, Ga.). 2018 Dec 1;50(6):677-683. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001079
Hoareau, Guillaume L. ; Kashtan, Harris ; Walker, Lauren E. ; Beyer, Carl ; Wishy, Andrew ; Grayson, J. Kevin ; Ross, James ; Stewart, Ian J. / A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine. In: Shock (Augusta, Ga.). 2018 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 677-683.
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