A novel approach to increase residents' involvement in reporting adverse events

David R. Scott, Melissa Weimer, Clea English, Lynn Shaker, William Ward, Dongseok Choi, Andrea Cedfeldt, Donald Girard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: In the wake of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005, national attention has increasingly focused on adverse-event reporting as a means of identifying systems changes to improve patient safety. However, physicians and residents have demonstrated meager involvement in this effort. METHOD: In 2008-2009, the authors measured participation in adverse-event reporting by 680 residents at Oregon Health & Science University before and after implementing a quality improvement initiative, which consisted of a financial incentive and multifaceted educational campaign. The primary measure of success was an increase in the average monthly adverse-event reports submitted by residents to greater than 5% of the institution's overall report submissions. RESULTS: The average number of adverse events reported by residents increased from 1.6% to 9.0% of the institution's overall event reports, representing a 5.6-fold increase during the initiative (P <.001). The relative percentage of resident-submitted reports defined as "near-misses" increased from 6% to 27% during the initiative (P <.001). CONCLUSIONS: The novel approach of integrating a retirement benefit and educational campaign to increase residents' involvement in adverse-event reporting was successful. In addition to increasing residents' contributions to adverse-event reporting to levels higher than any documented in the current literature, there was also a remarkable increase in the relative frequency of near-miss reporting by residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-746
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

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Patient Safety
Quality Improvement
resident
Pensions
event
Motivation
Physicians
Health
campaign
system change
retirement
incentive
act
physician
participation
science
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

A novel approach to increase residents' involvement in reporting adverse events. / Scott, David R.; Weimer, Melissa; English, Clea; Shaker, Lynn; Ward, William; Choi, Dongseok; Cedfeldt, Andrea; Girard, Donald.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 86, No. 6, 06.2011, p. 742-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, David R. ; Weimer, Melissa ; English, Clea ; Shaker, Lynn ; Ward, William ; Choi, Dongseok ; Cedfeldt, Andrea ; Girard, Donald. / A novel approach to increase residents' involvement in reporting adverse events. In: Academic Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 86, No. 6. pp. 742-746.
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