A narrative review of high-quality literature on the effects of resident duty hours reforms

Henry Lin, Emery Lin, Stephanie Auditore, Jon Fanning

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To summarize current high-quality studies evaluating the effect and efficacy of resident duty hours reforms (DHRs) on patient safety and resident education and well-being. Method The authors searched PubMed and Medline in August 2012 and again in May 2013 for literature (1987-2013) about the effects of DHRs. They assessed the quality of articles using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) scoring system. They considered randomized controlled trials (RCTs), partial RCTs, and all studies with a MERSQI score ≥ 14 to be "high-quality" methodology studies. Results A total of 72 high-quality studies met inclusion criteria. Most studies showed no change or slight improvement in mortality and complication rates after DHRs. Resident well-being was generally improved, but there was a perceived negative impact on education (knowledge acquisition, skills, and cognitive performance) following DHRs. Eleven high-quality studies assessed the impact of DHR interventions; all reported a neutral to positive impact. Seven high-quality studies assessed costs associated with DHRs and demonstrated an increase in hospital costs. Conclusions The results of most studies that allow enough time for DHR interventions to take effect suggest a benefit to patient safety and resident well-being, but the effect on the quality of training remains unknown. Additional methodologically sound studies on the impact of DHRs are necessary. Priorities for future research include approaches to optimizing education and clinical proficiency and studies on the effect of intervention strategies on both education and patient safety. Such studies will provide additional information to help improve duty hours policies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-150
Number of pages11
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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resident
narrative
reform
education
well-being
literature
knowledge acquisition
intervention strategy
costs
mortality
inclusion
methodology
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

A narrative review of high-quality literature on the effects of resident duty hours reforms. / Lin, Henry; Lin, Emery; Auditore, Stephanie; Fanning, Jon.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 91, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 140-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Lin, Henry ; Lin, Emery ; Auditore, Stephanie ; Fanning, Jon. / A narrative review of high-quality literature on the effects of resident duty hours reforms. In: Academic Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 91, No. 1. pp. 140-150.
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