A narrative review: Actigraphy as an objective assessment of perioperative sleep and activity in pediatric patients

Nicole Conrad, Joelle Karlik, Amy Lewandowski Holley, Anna C. Wilson, Jeffrey Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sleep is an important component of pediatric health and is crucial for cognitive development. Actigraphy is a validated, objective tool to capture sleep and movement data that is increasingly being used in the perioperative context. The aim of this review is to present recent pediatric studies that utilized actigraphy in the perioperative period, highlight gaps in the literature, and provide recommendations for future research. A literature search was completed using OVID and PubMed databases and articles were selected for inclusion based on relevance to the topic. The literature search resulted in 13 papers that utilized actigraphic measures. Results of the review demonstrated that actigraphy has been used to identify predictors and risk factors for poor postoperative sleep, examine associations among perioperative pain and sleep patterns, and assess activity and energy expenditure in both inpatient and outpatient settings. We propose expansion of actigraphy research to include assessment of sleep via actigraphy to: predict functional recovery in pediatric populations, to study postoperative sleep in high-risk pediatric patients, to test the efficacy of perioperative interventions, and to assess outcomes in special populations for which self-report data on sleep and activity is difficult to obtain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number26
JournalChildren
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2017

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Activity
  • Anesthesia
  • Children
  • Pediatric
  • Perioperative
  • Postoperative
  • Sleep
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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