A method to measure ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the capnogram

Andoni Elola, Beatriz Chicote, Elisabete Aramendi, Erik Alonso, Unai Irusta, Mohamud Ramzan Daya, James K. Russell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The survival rate in cardiac arrest is associated to the quality of the chest compressions (CCs) and ventilations provided during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hyperventilation remains common whenever ventilation is manual during resuscitation from cardiac arrest. The capnogram is used to monitor respiration and ventilation rates. During CPR chest compressions induce artefacts in the capnogram signal that challenge the detection of ventilations. The evaluation of ventilation detectors during CCs has not been well characterized. In this study an algorithm for ventilation rate monitoring and hyperventilation detection was developed. The processing method consists of detecting transitions in the first difference of the signal, and applying feature based classification to identify every ventilation. The instantaneous rate and hyperventilation minutes were then computed. A set of 20 out-of-hospital episodes, totalling 50864 s (86.6% during CCs) and 6305 ventilations was used to define and evaluate the algorithm. The algorithm had a sensitivity/ positive predictive value of 96.9%/96.2% respectively for the ventilation detection (96.7%/95.8% during ongoing CCs), 98.7%/98.7% for the hyperventilation detection, and a mean error of 0.4 (0.8) min-1 for the instantaneous ventilation rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationComputing in Cardiology
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages1001-1004
Number of pages4
Volume42
ISBN (Print)9781509006854
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 16 2016
Event42nd Computing in Cardiology Conference, CinC 2015 - Nice, France
Duration: Sep 6 2015Sep 9 2015

Other

Other42nd Computing in Cardiology Conference, CinC 2015
CountryFrance
CityNice
Period9/6/159/9/15

Fingerprint

Resuscitation
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Ventilation
Hyperventilation
Thorax
Heart Arrest
Respiratory Rate
Artifacts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Elola, A., Chicote, B., Aramendi, E., Alonso, E., Irusta, U., Daya, M. R., & Russell, J. K. (2016). A method to measure ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the capnogram. In Computing in Cardiology (Vol. 42, pp. 1001-1004). [7411082] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/CIC.2015.7411082

A method to measure ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the capnogram. / Elola, Andoni; Chicote, Beatriz; Aramendi, Elisabete; Alonso, Erik; Irusta, Unai; Daya, Mohamud Ramzan; Russell, James K.

Computing in Cardiology. Vol. 42 IEEE Computer Society, 2016. p. 1001-1004 7411082.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Elola, A, Chicote, B, Aramendi, E, Alonso, E, Irusta, U, Daya, MR & Russell, JK 2016, A method to measure ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the capnogram. in Computing in Cardiology. vol. 42, 7411082, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 1001-1004, 42nd Computing in Cardiology Conference, CinC 2015, Nice, France, 9/6/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/CIC.2015.7411082
Elola A, Chicote B, Aramendi E, Alonso E, Irusta U, Daya MR et al. A method to measure ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the capnogram. In Computing in Cardiology. Vol. 42. IEEE Computer Society. 2016. p. 1001-1004. 7411082 https://doi.org/10.1109/CIC.2015.7411082
Elola, Andoni ; Chicote, Beatriz ; Aramendi, Elisabete ; Alonso, Erik ; Irusta, Unai ; Daya, Mohamud Ramzan ; Russell, James K. / A method to measure ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the capnogram. Computing in Cardiology. Vol. 42 IEEE Computer Society, 2016. pp. 1001-1004
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