A high-fat diet impairs cooling-evoked brown adipose tissue activation via a vagal afferent mechanism

Christopher J. Madden, Shaun F. Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

In dramatic contrast to rats on a control diet, rats maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) failed to activate brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cooling despite robust increases in their BAT activity following direct activation of their BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in the raphe pallidus. Cervical vagotomy or blockade of glutamate receptors in the nucleus of the tractus solitarii (NTS) reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of coldevoked BAT activity. Thus, a HFD does not prevent rats from mounting a robust, centrally driven BAT thermogenesis; however, a HFD does alter a vagal afferent input to NTS neurons, thereby preventing the normal activation of BAT thermogenesis to cooling. These results, paralleling the absence of cooling-evoked glucose uptake in the BAT of obese humans, reveal a neural mechanism through which consumption of a HFD contributes to reduced energy expenditure and thus to weight gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E287-E292
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume311
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Nucleus of the solitary tract
  • Obesity
  • Vagus nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A high-fat diet impairs cooling-evoked brown adipose tissue activation via a vagal afferent mechanism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this