A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities

Douglas K. Novins, Laurie A. Moore, Janette Beals, Gregory A. Aarons, Traci Rieckmann, Carol E. Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. Objectives and Methods: We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n ≈ 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Results: Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. Conclusion and Scientific Significance: This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-522
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Substance-Related Disorders
Population Groups
Therapeutics
Ownership
Alaska Natives
Research
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Indians
  • North American
  • Research methods
  • Substance abuse treatment centers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities. / Novins, Douglas K.; Moore, Laurie A.; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A.; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 38, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 518-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Novins, Douglas K. ; Moore, Laurie A. ; Beals, Janette ; Aarons, Gregory A. ; Rieckmann, Traci ; Kaufman, Carol E. / A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities. In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 2012 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 518-522.
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