A dual-networks architecture of top-down control

Nico U F Dosenbach, Damien Fair, Alexander L. Cohen, Bradley L. Schlaggar, Steven E. Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

843 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Complex systems ensure resilience through multiple controllers acting at rapid and slower timescales. The need for efficient information flow through complex systems encourages small-world network structures. On the basis of these principles, a group of regions associated with top-down control was examined. Functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that each region had a specific combination of control signals; resting-state functional connectivity grouped the regions into distinct 'fronto-parietal' and 'cingulo-opercular' components. The fronto-parietal component seems to initiate and adjust control; the cingulo-opercular component provides stable 'set-maintenance' over entire task epochs. Graph analysis showed dense local connections within components and weaker 'long-range' connections between components, suggesting a small-world architecture. The control systems of the brain seem to embody the principles of complex systems, encouraging resilient performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-105
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Dosenbach, N. U. F., Fair, D., Cohen, A. L., Schlaggar, B. L., & Petersen, S. E. (2008). A dual-networks architecture of top-down control. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 12(3), 99-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2008.01.001

A dual-networks architecture of top-down control. / Dosenbach, Nico U F; Fair, Damien; Cohen, Alexander L.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Petersen, Steven E.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 12, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 99-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dosenbach, NUF, Fair, D, Cohen, AL, Schlaggar, BL & Petersen, SE 2008, 'A dual-networks architecture of top-down control', Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 99-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2008.01.001
Dosenbach, Nico U F ; Fair, Damien ; Cohen, Alexander L. ; Schlaggar, Bradley L. ; Petersen, Steven E. / A dual-networks architecture of top-down control. In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 99-105.
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