A developmental increase in the expression of messenger ribonucleic acid encoding a second form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the rhesus macaque hypothalamus

Valerie S. Latimer, Steven Kohama, Vasilios T. Garyfallou, Henryk Urbanski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    GnRH-I is thought to represent the primary neuroendocrine link between the brain and the reproductive axis. Recently, however, a second molecular form of this decapeptide (GnRH-II) was found to be highly expressed in the brains of humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, in situ hybridization was used to examine the regional expression of GnRH-II messenger ribonucleic acid in the hypothalamus of immature (0.6 yr) and adult (10-15 yr) male and female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Overall, no sex-related differences were observed. In all of the animals (n = 3 animals/group), intense hybridization of a monkey GnRH-II riboprobe was evident in the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus and to a lesser extent in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but no age- or sex-related differences were apparent. Intense hybridization of the riboprobe also occurred in the mediobasal hypothalamus, and this was markedly greater in the adults than in the immature animals. These data show that the expression of GnRH-II messenger ribonucleic acid increases developmentally in a key neuroendocrine center of the brain. Moreover, because GnRH-II can stimulate LH release in vivo, it is plausible that changes in its gene expression represent an important component of the mechanism by which the hypothalamus controls reproductive function.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)324-329
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
    Volume86
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2001

    Fingerprint

    Macaca mulatta
    Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
    Hypothalamus
    RNA
    Brain
    Animals
    Sex Characteristics
    Supraoptic Nucleus
    Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
    Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus
    Gene expression
    Primates
    Haplorhini
    In Situ Hybridization
    His(5)-Trp(7)-Tyr(8)-lHRH
    Gene Expression

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    Cite this

    A developmental increase in the expression of messenger ribonucleic acid encoding a second form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the rhesus macaque hypothalamus. / Latimer, Valerie S.; Kohama, Steven; Garyfallou, Vasilios T.; Urbanski, Henryk.

    In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 86, No. 1, 2001, p. 324-329.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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