A cost-effectiveness analysis of rooming-in and breastfeeding in neonatal opioid withdrawal

Carmen M. Avram, Leah Yieh, Dmitry Dukhovny, Aaron B. Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective âOur cost-effectiveness analysis investigated rooming-in versus not rooming-in to determine optimal management of neonates with neonatal opioid withdrawal (NOW). Study Design âA decision-analytic model was constructed using TreeAge to compare rooming-in versus not rooming-in in a theoretical cohort of 23,200 newborns, the estimated annual number affected by NOW in the United States. Additional considerations included the effect of breast milk versus formula milk in evaluating the need for pharmacotherapy. Primary outcomes were needed for pharmacotherapy and neurodevelopment. We assumed a societal perspective in evaluating costs and maternal-neonatal quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. Model inputs were derived from literature and varied in sensitivity analyses. Results âRooming-in resulted in fewer neonates requiring pharmacotherapy when compared with not rooming-in. The rooming-in group had more neonates with intact/mild neurodevelopmental impairment and fewer cases of moderate to severe impairment. Rooming-in resulted in cost savings of $509,652,728 and 12,333 additional QALYs per annual cohort. When the risk ratio of need for pharmacotherapy in rooming-in was varied across a clinically plausible range, rooming-in remained the cost-effective strategy. Conclusion âMaternal rooming-in with newborns affected by NOW leads to reduced costs and increased effectiveness. Management strategies should optimize nonpharmacological interventions as first-line treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of perinatology
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

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Breast Feeding
Opioid Analgesics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Drug Therapy
Mothers
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cost Savings
Human Milk
Milk
Odds Ratio
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • breastfeeding
  • Opioid
  • Rooming-in
  • Withdrawal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

A cost-effectiveness analysis of rooming-in and breastfeeding in neonatal opioid withdrawal. / Avram, Carmen M.; Yieh, Leah; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Caughey, Aaron B.

In: American journal of perinatology, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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