A comparison of acute stress paradigms

Hormonal responses and hypothalamic serotonin

J. M. Paris, S. A. Lorens, L. D. Van De Kar, J. H. Urban, K. D. Richardson-Morton, Cynthia Bethea

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effects of stress on plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma prolactin and corticosterone levels, and hypothalamic 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations were investigated using a 3 and 12 min conditioned fear (CER) paradigm; 20 min immobilization; 20 min exposure to shallow or deep cold water; 2, 12 and 22 min of intermittent footshock with or without 20 min recovery; and, a 3 min CER with 0, 10, 30 and 60 min recovery. PRA was increased by all the stressors, except shallow cold water, reaching a maximun after 12 min and returning to control values within 10-20 min post-stress. Prolactin levels also were increased by all the stressors, except shallow and deep cold water. Prolactin levels were maximal after 12 min and returned to baseline within 20-60 min post-stress, depending on the stressor. Corticosterone levels were elevated by all the stressors, but not as rapidly as PRA or prolactin, reaching a maximum after about 20 min and returning to baseline concentrations within 30-60 min post-stress. None of the stressors produced significant changes in hypothalamic 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)33-43
    Number of pages11
    JournalPhysiology and Behavior
    Volume39
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1987

    Fingerprint

    Prolactin
    Serotonin
    Renin
    Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
    Corticosterone
    Fear
    Water
    Immobilization

    Keywords

    • 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)
    • Cold swim
    • Conditioned fear
    • Corticosterone
    • Hypothalamus
    • Immobilization
    • Prolactin
    • Rat
    • Renin
    • Serotonin (5-HT)
    • Stress

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physiology (medical)
    • Behavioral Neuroscience

    Cite this

    Paris, J. M., Lorens, S. A., Van De Kar, L. D., Urban, J. H., Richardson-Morton, K. D., & Bethea, C. (1987). A comparison of acute stress paradigms: Hormonal responses and hypothalamic serotonin. Physiology and Behavior, 39(1), 33-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9384(87)90341-6

    A comparison of acute stress paradigms : Hormonal responses and hypothalamic serotonin. / Paris, J. M.; Lorens, S. A.; Van De Kar, L. D.; Urban, J. H.; Richardson-Morton, K. D.; Bethea, Cynthia.

    In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 1, 1987, p. 33-43.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Paris, JM, Lorens, SA, Van De Kar, LD, Urban, JH, Richardson-Morton, KD & Bethea, C 1987, 'A comparison of acute stress paradigms: Hormonal responses and hypothalamic serotonin', Physiology and Behavior, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 33-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9384(87)90341-6
    Paris, J. M. ; Lorens, S. A. ; Van De Kar, L. D. ; Urban, J. H. ; Richardson-Morton, K. D. ; Bethea, Cynthia. / A comparison of acute stress paradigms : Hormonal responses and hypothalamic serotonin. In: Physiology and Behavior. 1987 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 33-43.
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