A cognitively enhanced online Tai Ji Quan training intervention for community-dwelling older adults with mild cognitive impairment: A feasibility trial

Fuzhong Li, Peter Harmer, Kathleen Fitzgerald, Kerri Winters-Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study examines the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of a newly developed cognitive-enhancing Tai Ji Quan training intervention, delivered via remote videoconferencing, for older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: In a three-arm feasibility trial, community-dwelling older adults with MCI (N = 69; mean age = 74.6 years, 57% women) were randomized to a cognitively enhanced Tai Ji Quan (n = 23), standard Tai Ji Quan (n = 22), or stretching group (n = 24) and participated in a 60-minute online exercise session via Zoom, twice weekly for 16 weeks. Participants were recruited primarily in the state of Oregon through mass mailing and word of mouth. The primary outcomes were intervention feasibility (with respect to recruitment, online intervention delivery, fidelity and compliance, and attrition and retention rates), acceptability, and safety. We also assessed feasibility of online data collection and test-retest reliability and explored preliminary trends on secondary outcomes that included global cognitive function, dual-task cost, and domain-specific cognition function. Results: The study had an average recruitment rate of 55%. Feasibility was demonstrated by the overall successful online program implementation, with good fidelity, acceptable compliance (76%), and excellent retention (94%). The cognitively enhanced Tai Ji Quan intervention was shown to be acceptable to participants as well as safe, with no major intervention-related moderate/severe events. At week 16, the group receiving cognitively enhanced Tai Ji Quan training showed a positive trend in the cognitive function and dual-task outcome measures whereas the group receiving standard Tai Ji Quan training exhibited positive trends on global and domain-specific cognitive measures. Conclusions: Preliminary findings of this pilot study indicate the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of a tailored, cognitively enhanced Tai Ji Quan training intervention delivered remotely to home settings via videoconferencing for community-dwelling older adults with MCI. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT04070703.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number76
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dual-task
  • Elderly
  • Exercise
  • Tai Chi
  • Telehealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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