A Clinical Educational Intervention to Increase HPV Vaccination Rates Among Pediatric Patients Through Enhanced Recommendations

Kelley R. Davis, Sharon L. Norman, Bradley G. Olson, Shaban Demirel, Asma Taha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes largely preventable cancers by completing a vaccination series. However, pediatric HPV vaccination rates remain low. Current evidence indicates that integrating five factors creates a high-quality recommendation associated with higher HPV vaccination rates. This quality improvement project aimed to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention to improve the quality of providers’ recommendations and subsequent vaccination rates. Method: Using the Squire 2.0 Guidelines, clinical staff were observed during well-child visits (aged 11–12 years) before and after the intervention across three Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. Results: Thirty-nine encounters with mostly (n = 31; 80%) families of color. The quality of vaccine recommendations was improved after the intervention; however, vaccination rates did not increase for the 39 patients. Providers’ delivery approach (presumptive vs. conversational) did increase vaccination rates. Discussion: Providers’ delivery style appears to be important when making HPV vaccine recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatric Health Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • cancer prevention
  • HPV vaccine recommendation
  • human papillomavirus vaccine
  • PDSA cycles
  • quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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