A case control study of renal transplantation in patients with type I diabetes

J. L. Munson, W. M. Bennett, John Barry, Douglas Norman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A case control study was undertaken comparing the outcome of 208 renal allografts transplanted into diabetic recipients with those transplanted into an appropriately matched group of non-diabetic recipients. In each group there were 151 cadaver, 21 two-haplotype identical, 35 one-haplotype identical, and one zero-haplotype identical living-related grafts. For the entire group of diabetics, 1- and 5-year graft survivals were 71.3% and 46%. Graft survivals for the non-diabetic recipients at 1 and 5 yr were 81.8% and 57.8%, (p <0.05). In all patient subgroups divided according to the donor source, the graft and patient survival rates for the non-diabetic recipients exceeded those of the diabetic recipients. One- and 5-yr diabetic patient survivals were 90% and 70%, and for the non-diabetics they were 97% and 95%, respectively (p <0.001). There were 40 deaths among the diabetics and 15 among the non-diabetics. Cardiovascular disease was the major cause of death in the diabetics, accounting for 40% of the deaths. In addition, allograft loss due to patient death was a significant cause of graft loss in the diabetic group, 24 grafts (28%). Seven grafts (10%) were lost due to patient death in the nondiabetic group (p <0.05). Post-transplant, diabetic recipients had a greater incidence of stroke, angina, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, urinary tract infections (p <0.01 for each), and wound infections (p <0.05). Despite improvements in results with renal transplantation in diabetics, our study indicates that the results do not approach those of an appropriately matched group of non-diabetics. With their higher incidence of complications, the management of diabetics will continue to be a challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-311
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume6
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Kidney Transplantation
Case-Control Studies
Graft Survival
Haplotypes
Transplants
Allografts
Research Design
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Incidence
Wound Infection
Diabetes Complications
Cadaver
Urinary Tract Infections
Cause of Death
Cardiovascular Diseases
Survival Rate
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Tissue Donors

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Renal transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

A case control study of renal transplantation in patients with type I diabetes. / Munson, J. L.; Bennett, W. M.; Barry, John; Norman, Douglas.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1992, p. 306-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{04c4fe2bb3094a28b28104d5b01d1582,
title = "A case control study of renal transplantation in patients with type I diabetes",
abstract = "A case control study was undertaken comparing the outcome of 208 renal allografts transplanted into diabetic recipients with those transplanted into an appropriately matched group of non-diabetic recipients. In each group there were 151 cadaver, 21 two-haplotype identical, 35 one-haplotype identical, and one zero-haplotype identical living-related grafts. For the entire group of diabetics, 1- and 5-year graft survivals were 71.3{\%} and 46{\%}. Graft survivals for the non-diabetic recipients at 1 and 5 yr were 81.8{\%} and 57.8{\%}, (p <0.05). In all patient subgroups divided according to the donor source, the graft and patient survival rates for the non-diabetic recipients exceeded those of the diabetic recipients. One- and 5-yr diabetic patient survivals were 90{\%} and 70{\%}, and for the non-diabetics they were 97{\%} and 95{\%}, respectively (p <0.001). There were 40 deaths among the diabetics and 15 among the non-diabetics. Cardiovascular disease was the major cause of death in the diabetics, accounting for 40{\%} of the deaths. In addition, allograft loss due to patient death was a significant cause of graft loss in the diabetic group, 24 grafts (28{\%}). Seven grafts (10{\%}) were lost due to patient death in the nondiabetic group (p <0.05). Post-transplant, diabetic recipients had a greater incidence of stroke, angina, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, urinary tract infections (p <0.01 for each), and wound infections (p <0.05). Despite improvements in results with renal transplantation in diabetics, our study indicates that the results do not approach those of an appropriately matched group of non-diabetics. With their higher incidence of complications, the management of diabetics will continue to be a challenge.",
keywords = "Diabetes, Renal transplantation",
author = "Munson, {J. L.} and Bennett, {W. M.} and John Barry and Douglas Norman",
year = "1992",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "306--311",
journal = "Clinical Transplantation",
issn = "0902-0063",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A case control study of renal transplantation in patients with type I diabetes

AU - Munson, J. L.

AU - Bennett, W. M.

AU - Barry, John

AU - Norman, Douglas

PY - 1992

Y1 - 1992

N2 - A case control study was undertaken comparing the outcome of 208 renal allografts transplanted into diabetic recipients with those transplanted into an appropriately matched group of non-diabetic recipients. In each group there were 151 cadaver, 21 two-haplotype identical, 35 one-haplotype identical, and one zero-haplotype identical living-related grafts. For the entire group of diabetics, 1- and 5-year graft survivals were 71.3% and 46%. Graft survivals for the non-diabetic recipients at 1 and 5 yr were 81.8% and 57.8%, (p <0.05). In all patient subgroups divided according to the donor source, the graft and patient survival rates for the non-diabetic recipients exceeded those of the diabetic recipients. One- and 5-yr diabetic patient survivals were 90% and 70%, and for the non-diabetics they were 97% and 95%, respectively (p <0.001). There were 40 deaths among the diabetics and 15 among the non-diabetics. Cardiovascular disease was the major cause of death in the diabetics, accounting for 40% of the deaths. In addition, allograft loss due to patient death was a significant cause of graft loss in the diabetic group, 24 grafts (28%). Seven grafts (10%) were lost due to patient death in the nondiabetic group (p <0.05). Post-transplant, diabetic recipients had a greater incidence of stroke, angina, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, urinary tract infections (p <0.01 for each), and wound infections (p <0.05). Despite improvements in results with renal transplantation in diabetics, our study indicates that the results do not approach those of an appropriately matched group of non-diabetics. With their higher incidence of complications, the management of diabetics will continue to be a challenge.

AB - A case control study was undertaken comparing the outcome of 208 renal allografts transplanted into diabetic recipients with those transplanted into an appropriately matched group of non-diabetic recipients. In each group there were 151 cadaver, 21 two-haplotype identical, 35 one-haplotype identical, and one zero-haplotype identical living-related grafts. For the entire group of diabetics, 1- and 5-year graft survivals were 71.3% and 46%. Graft survivals for the non-diabetic recipients at 1 and 5 yr were 81.8% and 57.8%, (p <0.05). In all patient subgroups divided according to the donor source, the graft and patient survival rates for the non-diabetic recipients exceeded those of the diabetic recipients. One- and 5-yr diabetic patient survivals were 90% and 70%, and for the non-diabetics they were 97% and 95%, respectively (p <0.001). There were 40 deaths among the diabetics and 15 among the non-diabetics. Cardiovascular disease was the major cause of death in the diabetics, accounting for 40% of the deaths. In addition, allograft loss due to patient death was a significant cause of graft loss in the diabetic group, 24 grafts (28%). Seven grafts (10%) were lost due to patient death in the nondiabetic group (p <0.05). Post-transplant, diabetic recipients had a greater incidence of stroke, angina, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, urinary tract infections (p <0.01 for each), and wound infections (p <0.05). Despite improvements in results with renal transplantation in diabetics, our study indicates that the results do not approach those of an appropriately matched group of non-diabetics. With their higher incidence of complications, the management of diabetics will continue to be a challenge.

KW - Diabetes

KW - Renal transplantation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026794622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026794622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10147945

AN - SCOPUS:0026794622

VL - 6

SP - 306

EP - 311

JO - Clinical Transplantation

JF - Clinical Transplantation

SN - 0902-0063

IS - 4

ER -