5aPP9. Relationship between amplitude modulation in psychophysical tasks and speech in listeners with normal and impaired hearing

Eric Hoover, Pamela Souza, Frederick J. Gallun

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Previous work suggests that listeners with hearing loss may be unable to discriminate high-rate amplitude modulations, even when the modulation depth is above the modulation detection threshold [Grant et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. (1998)] 104, 1051-60. For listens with normal hearing, high-rate amplitude modulations contribute to speech understanding when spectral information is degraded [Xu et al., 117, 32 55-32 67 (2 005)]. In listens with hearing loss, the ability to use amplitude modulation in speech may be limited to frequencies at which modulation frequency discrimination is possible. To test this, amplitude modulation detection and discrimination thresholds were measured in listens with normal hearing and mild-to-moderate sensorineural loss. The signal was a broadband noise carrier sinusoidally amplitude modulated at rate of 10640 Hz. Sentence and nonsense syllable recognition was measured for the same listens. To restrict spectral information, speech was vocoded with a sinusoidal carrier modulated with three or six channels of envelope information Envelope filter cutoff frequency was varied from 10640 Hz. Compared to listens with normal hearing, the listens with hearing loss had more variable modulation frequency discrimination and that discrimination was related to their ability to use high-rate modulation information in speech recognition [Work supported by NIH.]

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number050009
JournalProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Event161st Meeting Acoustical Society of America 2011 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: May 23 2011May 27 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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