MODULATION OF ALCOHOL REINFORCEMENT

Project: Research project

Description

Addiction to alcohol and other drugs continues to be a major
problem with serious societal and health-related consequences.
Current basic research on the etiology of alcoholism is based on
the premise that this complex behavior pattern is jointly
determined by organismic (including genetic), environmental and
experiential variables. The research proposed here is especially
concerned with the roles played by environment and experience in
the modulation of physiological effects that may be critically
involved in regulating alcohol intake and in determining the
reinforcing value of alcohol. Recent studies have indicated that
ambient environmental temperature may affect alcohol
consumption in laboratory animals. This effect appears to be due
to the inverse relationship between ambient temperature and the
hypothermic response to alcohol. Our specific hypothesis is that
alcohol intake is regualted by the magnitude of its thermal effect.
When there is a large drop in body temperature following
ingestion of alcohol, subsequent consumption is reduced,
apparently as a result of taste aversion condition. However, if
alcohol-induced hypothermia is blocked by exposure to a warm
ambient temperateure, the aversive consequences of alcohol
appear to be reduced. The experiments proposed here will
systematically examine the effects of ambient temperature and
alcohol dose on three types of alcohol-reinforced behavior: oral
self administration, conditioned taste aversion and conditioned
place preference/aversion. They will addres several alternative
exdplanations of the effect of ambient temperature, including
possible changes in motivation, pharmacokinetics or other
physiological/biochemical effects of alcohol. This research may
eventually identify an important link between alcohol's affective
properties and a specific physiological effect of alcohol. This link
would justify increased study of alcohol's hypothermic effect and
its possible role in the development of excessive drinking and
alcoholism. The long-term goal of this research is to increase our
understanding of the biobehavioral processes involved in the
regulation of alcohol intake in order to improve our understanding
of alcoholism. Such efforts should help us to recognize increased
risk of alcohol abuse, to devise more efficient and effective
treatments for alcoholism and to outline more effective
prevention strategies.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date4/1/882/29/20

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $343,035.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $307,154.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $7,751.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $12,674.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $346,500.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $411,642.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $32,650.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $110,666.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $266,692.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $411,642.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $260,225.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $307,136.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $329,725.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $103,935.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $259,082.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $346,500.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $39,350.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $305,442.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $251,580.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $296,604.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $380,628.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $213,703.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $288,023.00

Fingerprint

Alcohols
Ethanol
Alcoholism
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Temperature
Research
Induced Hypothermia
Recurrence
Ventral Tegmental Area
Drinking
Pleasure
Cues
Hot Temperature
Learning
Body Temperature
Laboratory Animals
Brain
Alcohol Drinking
Secondary Prevention
Motivation

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)