INIA: Stress and Ethanol Self-Administration in Monkeys

    Project: Research project

    Project Details

    Description

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant):
    Stress is believed to be an etiological factor in the abuse of ethanol.
    Chronic and acute stress are known to alter the behavioral effects of ethanol,
    including the reinforcing effects. Available evidence also suggests that
    chronic stress alters neurotransmission in specific brain regions that are
    important for mediating the reinforcing effects of many drugs of abuse,
    including ethanol. However, there is a need to more completely characterize
    the limbic, hypothalamic, pituitary and adrenal response to stress an how this
    response predicts heavy ethanol self-administration. In addition, the source
    of stress can determine the endocrine and nervous systems response and
    adaptation. Macaque monkeys are social animals and form stable, liner, social
    dominance hierarchies. The relative rank of an individual within social
    hierarchies has trait-like qualities and remains constant, even if the monkeys
    are separated for some time. Many studies have shown that social subordination
    in macaque troops results in elevated signs of stress. Socially-derived stress
    in monkeys can be categorized as psychogenic and, in subordinate monkeys,
    uncontrollable. Stress of this nature is most associated with stress-induced
    psychiatric pathology, including alcoholism. We propose to investigate the
    effects of socially-derived stress, specifically social subordination and
    limited social contact on ethanol self-administration. We have developed a
    model of alcohol self-administration in macaque monkeys that produces
    excessive ethanol? consumption in a proportion of the population. The heavy
    drinkers are largely male and consume an average of 3.0-4. 0 g/kg/day (I 2-16
    drinks/day) with average blood ethanol concentrations of 160 mg% 8 hours into
    the daily drinking episode. With this model we propose to characterize the
    limbic, hypothalamic, pituitary and adrenal response to stress in naive
    monkeys and then explore how this response predicts heavy ethanol
    self-administration.
    StatusFinished
    Effective start/end date2/1/021/31/17

    Funding

    • National Institutes of Health: $480,116.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $581,084.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $231,795.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $47,457.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $511,826.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $447,069.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $472,967.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $286,290.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $98,466.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $576,826.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $516,444.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $597,217.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $193,398.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $473,798.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $284,468.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $98,953.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $497,810.00
    • National Institutes of Health: $104,867.00

    ASJC

    • Medicine(all)

    Fingerprint Explore the research topics touched on by this project. These labels are generated based on the underlying awards/grants. Together they form a unique fingerprint.