EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR LOW BACK PAIN

Project: Research project

Description

This proposal is intended to build on and extend the work of the low back
pain Patient Outcome Research Team (PORT). It is intended to provide
more definitive information for refining and implementing clinical
guidelines about lumbar spine surgery and its alternatives. This project
will be based in the Department of Health Services at the University of
Washington, with extensive involvement by the School of Medicine, the
Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, and the Maine Medical Assessment
Foundation. Specific aims of the project are: (1) for patients with
sciatica or spinal stenosis, to compare long-term functional and work-
related outcomes of alternative surgical and nonsurgical treatments; and
(2) to assess the impact of back pain guidelines and health care reform
efforts on regional and national trends in back surgery rates,
reoperation rates, fusion rates, and nonsurgical hospitalization rates.
To accomplish these aims, we propose continued long-term follow-up of
over 600 surgically and nonsurgically treated patients in the ongoing
Maine community-based cohort study. Also, we propose to analyze annually
updated data from Washington State's hospital discharge registry, the
National Hospital Discharge Survey, and Medicare claims, to assess
responses to PORT-related activities, new guidelines, and state and
national health care reform efforts. These analyses will employ
validated analytic methods for case selection and comorbidity adjustment
developed by the PORT, and can be accomplished relatively efficiently and
inexpensively.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date8/1/947/31/99

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

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Low Back Pain
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health Care Reform
Guidelines
Student Health Services
Spinal Stenosis
State Hospitals
Back Pain
Medicare
Reoperation
Registries
Comorbidity
Hospitalization
Spine
Cohort Studies
Medicine
Health Care Surveys
Sciatica
Health
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)